NIGHT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - night in David Copperfield
1  Peggotty and I were sitting one night by the parlour fire, alone.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
2  On the last night of my restraint, I was awakened by hearing my own name spoken in a whisper.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
3  From that night there grew up in my breast a feeling for Peggotty which I cannot very well define.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
4  One Sunday night my mother reads to Peggotty and me in there, how Lazarus was raised up from the dead.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
5  I write of her just as she was when I had gone to bed after this talk, and she came to bid me good night.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
6  When this appeared improbable for that night, I undressed, and went to bed; and, there, I began to wonder fearfully what would be done to me.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
7  The difficulties under which they had laboured all night, and which had found utterance in the most terrific gasps and snorts, are not to be conceived.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
8  I took heart to tell him that I had had nothing all night, and that if he would allow me to buy something to eat, I should be very much obliged to him.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
9  From that time, Miss Murdstone kept the keys in her own little jail all day, and under her pillow all night, and my mother had no more to do with them than I had.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
10  I did not feel, at first, that I knew him as well as he knew me, because he had never come to our house since the night I was born, and naturally he had the advantage of me.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
11  As slumber gradually stole upon me, I heard the wind howling out at sea and coming on across the flat so fiercely, that I had a lazy apprehension of the great deep rising in the night.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
12  Of the geese outside the side-gate who come waddling after me with their long necks stretched out when I go that way, I dream at night: as a man environed by wild beasts might dream of lions.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
13  Without being nearly so much surprised as I had expected, my mother entered into it readily; and it was all arranged that night, and my board and lodging during the visit were to be paid for.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
14  I was so sorry for my mother's distress; but I groped my way out, and groped my way up to my room in the dark, without even having the heart to say good night to Peggotty, or to get a candle from her.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
15  One night when Miss Murdstone had been developing certain household plans to her brother, of which he signified his approbation, my mother suddenly began to cry, and said she thought she might have been consulted.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
16  A dark store-room opens out of it, and that is a place to be run past at night; for I don't know what may be among those tubs and jars and old tea-chests, when there is nobody in there with a dimly-burning light, letting a mouldy air come out of the door, in which there is the smell of soap, pickles, pepper, candles, and coffee, all at one whiff.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
17  I remember dreaming night after night, of being with my mother as she used to be, or of going to a party at Mr. Peggotty's, or of travelling outside the stage-coach, or of dining again with my unfortunate friend the waiter, and in all these circumstances making people scream and stare, by the unhappy disclosure that I had nothing on but my little night-shirt, and that placard.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
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