OFFEND in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - offend in David Copperfield
1  'You are not offended,' said Dora.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. DOMESTIC
2  I hope that gentleman will take warning, sir, and will not be offended at my freedom.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 61. I AM SHOWN TWO INTERESTING PENITENTS
3  I began to reflect whether I had done anything to offend her; and my conscience whispered me that I had not yet told her about Dora.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34. MY AUNT ASTONISHES ME
4  Though I saw an uneasy change in Mr. Micawber, which sat tightly on him, as if his new duties were a misfit, I felt I had no right to be offended.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 39. WICKFIELD AND HEEP
5  But though Peggotty's eye wanders, she is much offended if mine does, and frowns to me, as I stand upon the seat, that I am to look at the clergyman.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
6  Afraid of offending him by pursuing the subject when he made so light of it, I only pursued it in my thoughts as we went on at even a quicker pace than before.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22. SOME OLD SCENES, AND SOME NEW PEOPLE
7  Mr. Copperfield,' returned Mr. Micawber, bitterly, 'when I was an inmate of that retreat I could look my fellow-man in the face, and punch his head if he offended me.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 49. I AM INVOLVED IN MYSTERY
8  He never said who was the real offender, though he smarted for it next day, and was imprisoned so many hours that he came forth with a whole churchyard-full of skeletons swarming all over his Latin Dictionary.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. MY 'FIRST HALF' AT SALEM HOUSE
9  Jugs of water, and watering-pots, were kept in secret places ready to be discharged on the offending boys; sticks were laid in ambush behind the door; sallies were made at all hours; and incessant war prevailed.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. THE SEQUEL OF MY RESOLUTION
10  I ought to observe, however, in explanation of that lady's state of mind, that she was much offended by Peggotty's tucking up her widow's gown before she had been ten minutes in the place, and setting to work to dust my bedroom.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. THE BEGINNING OF A LONG JOURNEY
11  After dinner, when we were sitting by the fire, and I was meditating an escape to Peggotty without having the hardihood to slip away, lest it should offend the master of the house, a coach drove up to the garden-gate and he went out to receive the visitor.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
12  I had perception enough to know that my mother was the victim always; that she was afraid to speak to me or to be kind to me, lest she should give them some offence by her manner of doing so, and receive a lecture afterwards; that she was not only ceaselessly afraid of her own offending, but of my offending, and uneasily watched their looks if I only moved.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. MY HOLIDAYS. ESPECIALLY ONE HAPPY AFTERNOON
13  The great relief and satisfaction experienced by the boys made them difficult to manage; and though the dreaded Tungay brought his wooden leg in twice or thrice, and took notes of the principal offenders' names, no great impression was made by it, as they were pretty sure of getting into trouble tomorrow, do what they would, and thought it wise, no doubt, to enjoy themselves today.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7. MY 'FIRST HALF' AT SALEM HOUSE