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Quotes from Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius by Niccolo Machiavelli
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 Current Search - origin in Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius
1  These as they have had different origins, so likewise have had different laws and institutions.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II.
2  One kind of war has its origin in the ambition of princes or republics who seek to extend their dominions.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII.
3  But the demands of a free people are hurtful to freedom, since they originate either in being oppressed, or in the fear that they are about to be so.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV.
4  And, first, as touching its origin, I say, that all cities have been founded either by the people of the country in which they stand, or by strangers.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I.
5  As a remedy, I would recommend that course being adopted which was followed by the Roman republic in order to be less ungrateful than others, having its origin in the nature of the Roman government.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXX.
6  Among many cities taking their origin in this way were Athens and Venice; the former of which, for reasons like those just now mentioned, was built by a scattered population under the direction of Theseus.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I.
7  The origin of cities may be said to be independent when a people, either by themselves or under some prince, are constrained by famine, pestilence, or war to leave their native land and seek a new habitation.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I.
8  But Florence, and other cities having a like origin, committed this power into the hands of a foreigner, whom they styled Captain, and as he was open to be corrupted by powerful citizens this was a pernicious course.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XLIX.
9  Wherefore the temples, the prayers, the sacrifices, and all the other rites of their worship, had their origin in this, that the oracles of Delos, of Dodona, and others celebrated in antiquity, held the world admiring and devout.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII.
10  Nor can we reasonably pronounce that city ill-governed wherein we find so many instances of virtue; for virtuous actions have their origin in right training, right training in wise laws, and wise laws in these very tumults which many would thoughtlessly condemn.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV.
11  In conclusion it is to be said that while this vice of ingratitude has its origin either in avarice or in suspicion, commonwealths are rarely led into it by avarice, and far seldomer than princes by suspicion, having, as shall presently be shown, far less reason than princes for suspecting.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXIX.
12  So likewise, when Tiberius Gracchus was appointed, during the war with Hannibal, to command a body of slaves, whom the Romans in their straits for soldiers had furnished with arms, one of his first acts was to pass an order making it death for any to reproach his men with their servile origin.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXVI.
13  For the new names which we find in Italy and elsewhere, have no other origin than in their having been given by these new occupants; as when the countries formerly known as Gallia Cisalpina and Gallia Transalpina took the names of Lombardy and France, from the Lombards and the Franks who settled themselves there.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII.
14  But all these mistaken methods and opinions originate in the weakness of rulers, who, seeing that they cannot hold their States by their own strength and valour, have recourse to like devices; which, if now and then in tranquil times they prove of some slight assistance to them, in times of danger are shown to be worthless.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XXVII.
15  Among the causes which have a human origin are the changes in sects and tongues; because when a new sect, that is to say a new religion, comes up, its first endeavour, in order to give itself reputation, is to efface the old; and should it so happen that the founders of the new religion speak another tongue, this may readily be effected.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V.
16  And this distinction could grow up and maintain itself without causing disturbance; for as at the time of its origin, whosoever then lived in Venice was made one of the governing body, none had reason to complain; while those who came to live there afterwards, finding the government in a completed form, had neither ground nor opportunity to object.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI.
17  Cosimo de Medici, to whom the house of the Medici in Florence owes the origin of its fortunes, acquired so great a name from the favour wherewith his own prudence and the blindness of others invested him, that coming to be held in awe by the government, his fellow-citizens deemed it dangerous to offend him, but still more dangerous to let him alone.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXXIII.
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