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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - over in David Copperfield
1  I redden, tumble over half-a-dozen words, and stop.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
2  I promised, of course; and we kissed one another over and over again, and I soon fell fast asleep.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
3  I turned over on my face, I recollect, to hide my trembling lip, which answered her with greater truth.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
4  We all said something, or looked something, to welcome him, except Mrs. Gummidge, who only shook her head over her knitting.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
5  I fancied, indeed, that he sometimes chuckled audibly over this reflection, but the carrier said he was only troubled with a cough.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
6  It is astonishing to me now, how I found time, in the midst of my porings and blunderings over heavier themes, to read those books as I did.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
7  I looked in all directions, as far as I could stare over the wilderness, and away at the sea, and away at the river, but no house could I make out.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
8  My sobs kept waking me, for a long time; and when one very strong sob quite hoisted me up in bed, I found my mother sitting on the coverlet, and leaning over me.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
9  The coach was in the yard, shining very much all over, but without any horses to it as yet; and it looked in that state as if nothing was more unlikely than its ever going to London.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
10  The very sight of these two has such an influence over me, that I begin to feel the words I have been at infinite pains to get into my head, all sliding away, and going I don't know where.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
11  The setting sun was glowing on the strange lady, over the garden-fence, and she came walking up to the door with a fell rigidity of figure and composure of countenance that could have belonged to nobody else.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
12  To hear the wind getting up out at sea, to know that the fog was creeping over the desolate flat outside, and to look at the fire, and think that there was no house near but this one, and this one a boat, was like enchantment.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
13  It looked rather spongy and soppy, I thought, as I carried my eye over the great dull waste that lay across the river; and I could not help wondering, if the world were really as round as my geography book said, how any part of it came to be so flat.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
14  Those allied powers were considerably astonished, when they arrived within a few minutes of each other, to find an unknown lady of portentous appearance, sitting before the fire, with her bonnet tied over her left arm, stopping her ears with jewellers' cotton.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
15  So I was sent upstairs to Peggotty to be made spruce; and in the meantime Mr. Murdstone dismounted, and, with his horse's bridle drawn over his arm, walked slowly up and down on the outer side of the sweetbriar fence, while my mother walked slowly up and down on the inner to keep him company.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
16  I pore over these cheeses without any result or enlightenment until dinner-time, when, having made a Mulatto of myself by getting the dirt of the slate into the pores of my skin, I have a slice of bread to help me out with the cheeses, and am considered in disgrace for the rest of the evening.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
17  It was Miss Murdstone who was arrived, and a gloomy-looking lady she was; dark, like her brother, whom she greatly resembled in face and voice; and with very heavy eyebrows, nearly meeting over her large nose, as if, being disabled by the wrongs of her sex from wearing whiskers, she had carried them to that account.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
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