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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - own in David Copperfield
1  'Yes, my own precious Davy,' she replied.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
2  I felt my own attracted, no less steadily, to his.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
3  She only shook her own head at him, but in a way that made him quail.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
4  I have sustained my own idea of Roderick Random for a month at a stretch, I verily believe.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
5  On the last night of my restraint, I was awakened by hearing my own name spoken in a whisper.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
6  She put out her hand to him as she spoke, and, as he met it with his own, she glanced, I thought, at me.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
7  It appeared to me that he was more clever and cold than they were, and that they regarded him with something of my own feeling.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
8  Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
9  From that time, Miss Murdstone kept the keys in her own little jail all day, and under her pillow all night, and my mother had no more to do with them than I had.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
10  I can make no claim therefore to have known, at that time, how matters stood; or to have any remembrance, founded on the evidence of my own senses, of what follows.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
11  There was a twitch of Miss Betsey's head, after each of these sentences, as if her own old wrongs were working within her, and she repressed any plainer reference to them by strong constraint.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
12  Every barn in the neighbourhood, every stone in the church, and every foot of the churchyard, had some association of its own, in my mind, connected with these books, and stood for some locality made famous in them.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
13  I was very sorry for her; but there were moments when it would have been more agreeable, I thought, if Mrs. Gummidge had had a convenient apartment of her own to retire to, and had stopped there until her spirits revived.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
14  However I might have expressed my comprehension of it at that time, if I had been called upon, I nevertheless did clearly comprehend in my own way, that it was another name for tyranny; and for a certain gloomy, arrogant, devil's humour, that was in them both.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
15  Then Peggotty fitted her mouth close to the keyhole, and delivered these words through it with as much feeling and earnestness as a keyhole has ever been the medium of communicating, I will venture to assert: shooting in each broken little sentence in a convulsive little burst of its own.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
16  Then, in the privacy of my own little cabin, she informed me that Ham and Em'ly were an orphan nephew and niece, whom my host had at different times adopted in their childhood, when they were left destitute: and that Mrs. Gummidge was the widow of his partner in a boat, who had died very poor.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
17  I never hear the name, or read the name, of Yarmouth, but I am reminded of a certain Sunday morning on the beach, the bells ringing for church, little Em'ly leaning on my shoulder, Ham lazily dropping stones into the water, and the sun, away at sea, just breaking through the heavy mist, and showing us the ships, like their own shadows.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
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