POOR in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - poor in Northanger Abbey
1  My poor head, I had quite forgot it.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
2  For poor Captain Tilney too she was greatly concerned.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
3  I do not know when poor Richard's cravats would be done, if he had no friend but you.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
4  She remained there at least an hour, in the greatest agitation, deeply commiserating the state of her poor friend, and expecting a summons herself from the angry general to attend him in his own apartment.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 24
5  It taught him that he had been scarcely more misled by Thorpe's first boast of the family wealth than by his subsequent malicious overthrow of it; that in no sense of the word were they necessitous or poor, and that Catherine would have three thousand pounds.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31
6  The three others still continued together, walking in a most uncomfortable manner to poor Catherine; sometimes not a word was said, sometimes she was again attacked with supplications or reproaches, and her arm was still linked within Isabella's, though their hearts were at war.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
7  This critique, the justness of which was unfortunately lost on poor Catherine, brought them to the door of Mrs. Thorpe's lodgings, and the feelings of the discerning and unprejudiced reader of Camilla gave way to the feelings of the dutiful and affectionate son, as they met Mrs. Thorpe, who had descried them from above, in the passage.
Northanger Abbey By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7