PRIVILEGE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - privilege in David Copperfield
1  I shall begin to assert the privileges of a mother-in-law, if you go on like that, and scold you.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. I AM A NEW BOY IN MORE SENSES THAN ONE
2  If such is the case, and Mr. Micawber forfeits no privilege by entering on these duties, my anxiety is set at rest.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36. ENTHUSIASM
3  We took things much more easily in the Commons than they could be taken anywhere else, he observed, and that set us, as a privileged class, apart.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. I FALL INTO CAPTIVITY
4  The proposed tea-drinkings being quite impracticable, I compounded with Miss Lavinia for permission to visit every Saturday afternoon, without detriment to my privileged Sundays.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. DORA'S AUNTS
5  He had proudly resumed his privilege, in many of his spare hours, of walking up and down the garden with the Doctor; as he had been accustomed to pace up and down The Doctor's Walk at Canterbury.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 42. MISCHIEF
6  Peggotty had considered herself highly privileged in being allowed to participate in these labours; and, although she still retained something of her old sentiment of awe in reference to my aunt, had received so many marks of encouragement and confidence, that they were the best friends possible.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37. A LITTLE COLD WATER
7  'Emma, my love,' said Mr. Micawber, clearing his throat in his magnificent way, 'my friend Mr. Thomas Traddles is so obliging as to solicit, in my ear, that he should have the privilege of ordering the ingredients necessary to the composition of a moderate portion of that Beverage which is peculiarly associated, in our minds, with the Roast Beef of Old England.'
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 57. THE EMIGRANTS