ROAD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
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 Current Search - road in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
1  I must go up the road and waylay him.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII.
2  I took up the river road as hard as I could put.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
3  Keep the river road all the way, and next time you tramp take shoes and socks with you.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI.
4  Pretty soon a splendid young man come galloping down the road, setting his horse easy and looking like a soldier.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
5  Well, when it come dark I tuck out up de river road, en went 'bout two mile er more to whah dey warn't no houses.'
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII.
6  Tom was over the stile and starting for the house; the wagon was spinning up the road for the village, and we was all bunched in the front door.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII.
7  It was only a little thing to do, and no trouble; and it's the little things that smooths people's roads the most, down here below; it would make Mary Jane comfortable, and it wouldn't cost nothing.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII.
8  I'd ruther not tell you where I put it, Miss Mary Jane, if you don't mind letting me off; but I'll write it for you on a piece of paper, and you can read it along the road to Mr. Lothrop's, if you want to.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII.
9  Hines let out a whoop, like everybody else, and dropped my wrist and give a big surge to bust his way in and get a look, and the way I lit out and shinned for the road in the dark there ain't nobody can tell.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX.
10  So I slid out and slipped off up the road, and there warn't anybody at the church, except maybe a hog or two, for there warn't any lock on the door, and hogs likes a puncheon floor in summer-time because it's cool.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
11  Well, we swarmed along down the river road, just carrying on like wildcats; and to make it more scary the sky was darking up, and the lightning beginning to wink and flitter, and the wind to shiver amongst the leaves.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX.
12  Then I struck up the road, and when I passed the mill I see a sign on it, "Phelps's Sawmill," and when I come to the farm-houses, two or three hundred yards further along, I kept my eyes peeled, but didn't see nobody around, though it was good daylight now.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI.
13  And twice I went down the rod away in the night, and slipped around front, and see her setting there by her candle in the window with her eyes towards the road and the tears in them; and I wished I could do something for her, but I couldn't, only to swear that I wouldn't never do nothing to grieve her any more.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLI.
14  Children was heeling it ahead of the mob, screaming and trying to get out of the way; and every window along the road was full of women's heads, and there was nigger boys in every tree, and bucks and wenches looking over every fence; and as soon as the mob would get nearly to them they would break and skaddle back out of reach.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII.