SAD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
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1  Thus, like the sad presaging raven, that tolls.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
2  Good yeoman," said Cedric, "my heart is oppressed with sadness.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII.
3  Two halberdiers, clad in black, guarded the drawbridge, and others, in the same sad livery, glided to and fro upon the walls with a funereal pace, resembling spectres more than soldiers.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
4  By St Dunstan," answered Gurth, "thou speakest but sad truths; little is left to us but the air we breathe, and that appears to have been reserved with much hesitation, solely for the purpose of enabling us to endure the tasks they lay upon our shoulders.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
5  Meantime Lucas Beaumanoir walked in a small garden belonging to the Preceptory, included within the precincts of its exterior fortification, and held sad and confidential communication with a brother of his Order, who had come in his company from Palestine.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
6  Thou art right, good yeoman," answered Richard; "and if I had Ivanhoe, on the one hand, to give grave advice, and recommend it by the sad gravity of his brow, and thee, on the other, to trick me into what thou thinkest my own good, I should have as little the freedom of mine own will as any king in Christendom or Heathenesse.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLI
7  That of the serf, or bondsman, was sad and sullen; his aspect was bent on the ground with an appearance of deep dejection, which might be almost construed into apathy, had not the fire which occasionally sparkled in his red eye manifested that there slumbered, under the appearance of sullen despondency, a sense of oppression, and a disposition to resistance.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER I