SMELL in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - smell in David Copperfield
1  Then Dora held my flowers to Jip to smell.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33. BLISSFUL
2  Then Jip growled, and wouldn't smell them.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33. BLISSFUL
3  I know it was near the bar, on account of the smell of spirits and jingling of glasses.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. SOMEBODY TURNS UP
4  He was a dreadful old man to look at, in a filthy flannel waistcoat, and smelling terribly of rum.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. THE SEQUEL OF MY RESOLUTION
5  There is a strange unwholesome smell upon the room, like mildewed corduroys, sweet apples wanting air, and rotten books.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
6  I think it was over the kitchen, because a warm greasy smell appeared to come up through the chinks in the floor, and there was a flabby perspiration on the walls.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. SOMEBODY TURNS UP
7  I followed the young woman, and we soon came to a very neat little cottage with cheerful bow-windows: in front of it, a small square gravelled court or garden full of flowers, carefully tended, and smelling deliciously.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. THE SEQUEL OF MY RESOLUTION
8  One thing I particularly noticed in this delightful house, was the smell of fish; which was so searching, that when I took out my pocket-handkerchief to wipe my nose, I found it smelt exactly as if it had wrapped up a lobster.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
9  The only circumstance which gave me any new hope, was my aunt's stopping on the stairs to inquire about a smell of fire that was prevalent there; and janet's replying that she had been making tinder down in the kitchen, of my old shirt.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. THE SEQUEL OF MY RESOLUTION
10  We loitered along in front of them, and Dora often stopped to admire this one or that one, and I stopped to admire the same one, and Dora, laughing, held the dog up childishly, to smell the flowers; and if we were not all three in Fairyland, certainly I was.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. I FALL INTO CAPTIVITY
11  The very air of the best parlour, when I went in at the door, the bright condition of the fire, the shining of the wine in the decanters, the patterns of the glasses and plates, the faint sweet smell of cake, the odour of Miss Murdstone's dress, and our black clothes.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. I HAVE A MEMORABLE BIRTHDAY
12  I got some breakfast on the Heath, and walked back to Doctors' Commons, along the watered roads and through a pleasant smell of summer flowers, growing in gardens and carried into town on hucksters' heads, intent on this first effort to meet our altered circumstances.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35. DEPRESSION
13  The earthy smell, the sunless air, the sensation of the world being shut out, the resounding of the organ through the black and white arched galleries and aisles, are wings that take me back, and hold me hovering above those days, in a half-sleeping and half-waking dream.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18. A RETROSPECT
14  A dark store-room opens out of it, and that is a place to be run past at night; for I don't know what may be among those tubs and jars and old tea-chests, when there is nobody in there with a dimly-burning light, letting a mouldy air come out of the door, in which there is the smell of soap, pickles, pepper, candles, and coffee, all at one whiff.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE