SOVEREIGN in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
 Current Search - sovereign in Ivanhoe
1  By stature and by beauty mark'd their sovereign Queen.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
2  It is well," he said; "to-morrow we will ourself conduct this mute sovereign to her seat of dignity.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
3  Nay, nay," said De Bracy, "let the fair sovereign's throne remain unoccupied, until the conqueror shall be named, and then let him choose the lady by whom it shall be filled.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
4  Prince John, though not yet a monarch, had in Waldemar Fitzurse all the inconveniences of a favourite minister, who, in serving his sovereign, must always do so in his own way.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
5  The nobles themselves, each fortified within his own castle, and playing the petty sovereign over his own dominions, were the leaders of bands scarce less lawless and oppressive than those of the avowed depredators.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
6  So saying, the Prince marshalled Rowena to the seat of honour opposite his own, while the fairest and most distinguished ladies present crowded after her to obtain places as near as possible to their temporary sovereign.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
7  The little ready money which was in the country was chiefly in possession of this persecuted people, and the nobility hesitated not to follow the example of their sovereign, in wringing it from them by every species of oppression, and even personal torture.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
8  For the opposite reason, Prince John hated and contemned the few Saxon families of consequence which subsisted in England, and omitted no opportunity of mortifying and affronting them; being conscious that his person and pretensions were disliked by them, as well as by the greater part of the English commons, who feared farther innovation upon their rights and liberties, from a sovereign of John's licentious and tyrannical disposition.
Ivanhoe By Walter Scott
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII