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Quotes from Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius by Niccolo Machiavelli
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 Current Search - territory in Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius
1  The enemy, on being routed, to save their country from pillage, very soon came to terms, when the Romans would take from them certain portions of their territory.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI.
2  They could not, however, extend their conquests beyond Italy; while even within the limits of Italy, much territory remained unoccupied by them for reasons presently to be noticed.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV.
3  Whereupon the Romans grew less eager to punish their enemies by dividing their lands, and were content, when they deprived any city of its territory, to send colonists to occupy it.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXXVII.
4  Were any one, therefore, about to found a wholly new republic, he would have to consider whether he desired it to increase as Rome did in territory and dominion, or to continue within narrow limits.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI.
5  But as they have departed from all those other methods already spoken of, so have they departed from this, and with this result, that to them the acquisition of territory is rather a loss than a gain, as presently shall be shown.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVIII.
6  This proposal, however, was defeated by those who had been the prime movers of the revolt, who, fearing that the whole punishment might fall on their heads, to put a stop to any talk of an adjustment, incited the multitude to take up arms and make a foray into the Roman territory.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XXXII.
7  In the second case he might give his republic a constitution like that of Venice or Sparta; but since extension is the ruin of such republics, the legislator would have to provide in every possible way against the State which he had founded making any additions to its territories.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI.
8  This, however, I desire to say, that I would not have it understood that any fraud is glorious which leads you to break your plighted word, or to depart from covenants to which you have agreed; for though to do so may sometimes gain you territory and power, it can never, as I have said elsewhere, gain you glory.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XL.
9  Yet we know that the Pope, as soon as he had obtained what he wanted, made friends with them, and that Spain did the like; and that both the one and the other of these powers would gladly have saved the Lombard territory for themselves, nor would, if they could have helped it, have left it to France, so as to augment her influence in Italy.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XI.
10  In the second case, namely of a city being founded by strangers, the settlers are either wholly independent, or they are controlled by others, as where colonies are sent forth either by a prince or by a republic, to relieve their countries of an excessive population, or to defend newly acquired territories which it is sought to secure at small cost.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I.
11  Those who hold a contrary opinion contend that to have your enemy at a disadvantage you must get him away from his home, alleging the case of the Athenians, who while they carried on the war at their convenience in their own territory, retained their superiority; but when they quitted that territory, and went with their armies to Sicily, lost their freedom.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XII.
12  Of which we find many instances, both in early times, as when by the intervention of Charles the Great she drove the Lombards, who had made themselves masters of nearly the whole country, out of Italy; and also in recent times, as when, with the help of France, she first stripped the Venetians of their territories, and then, with the help of the Swiss, expelled the French.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII.
13  Philip of Macedon, the father of Perseus, a great soldier in his day, and of a great name, on being invaded by the Romans, laid waste and relinquished much of his territory which he thought he could not defend; rightly judging it more hurtful to his reputation to lose territory after an attempt to defend it, than to abandon it to the enemy as something he cared little to retain.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XXXVII.
14  It is for your interest, therefore, not to fight, when you possess the same advantages as Fabius, or as Cneius Sulpitius had; in other words, when your army is so formidable in itself that the enemy dare not attack you in your intrenchments, and although he has got within your territory has yet gained no footing there, and suffers in consequence from the want of necessary supplies.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X.
15  From which distrust it arises that often in republics the right course is not followed; as when Venice, as has been related, on being attacked by many enemies, could not, until her ruin was complete, resolve to make friends with any one of them by restoring those territories she had taken from them, on account of which war had been declared and a league of princes formed against her.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER LIII.
16  I come to this conclusion from observing the example of those who, although their territories be enclosed by mountains and precipices, have not, on being attacked by powerful enemies, attempted to fight on the mountains or in the defiles, but have advanced beyond them to meet their foes; or, if unwilling to advance, have awaited attack behind their mountains, on level and not on broken ground.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXIII.
17  For that people, whether driven by necessity, or attracted by the excellence of the fruits, and still more of the wine of Italy, came there under their chief, Bellovesus; and after defeating and expelling the inhabitants of the country, settled themselves therein, and there built many cities; calling the district Gallia, after the name they then bore: and this territory they retained until they were subdued by the Romans.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV.
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