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Quotes of TIME from James Joyce

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Once upon a time and a very good time it was there was a moocow coming down along the road and this moocow that was coming down along the road met a nicens little boy named baby tuckoo.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 1   Context
But the Christmas vacation was very far away: but one time it would come because the earth moved round always.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 1   Context
That was a long time ago then out on the playgrounds in the evening light, creeping from point to point on the fringe of his line, a heavy bird flying low through the grey light.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 1   Context
For some time he had felt the slight change in his house; and those changes in what he had deemed unchangeable were so many slight shocks to his boyish conception of the world.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 2   Context
It was Heron who had called out and, as he marched forward between his two attendants, he cleft the air before him with a thin cane in time to their steps.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 2   Context
He gave them ear only for a time but he was happy only when he was far from them, beyond their call, alone or in the company of phantasmal comrades.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 2   Context
Stephen, leaning back and drawing idly on his scribbler, listened to the talk about him which Heron checked from time to time by saying:.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
At the last moment of consciousness the whole earthly life passed before the vision of the soul and, ere it had time to reflect, the body had died and the soul stood terrified before the judgement seat.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
He had long been patient, pleading with the sinful soul, giving it time to repent, sparing it yet awhile.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
Moreover, our earthly fire destroys at the same time as it burns, so that the more intense it is the shorter is its duration; but the fire of hell has this property, that it preserves that which it burns, and, though it rages with incredible intensity, it rages for ever.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
God could call him now, call him as he sat at his desk, before he had time to be conscious of the summons.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
But while they are everlasting they are at the same time, as you know, intolerably intense, unbearably extensive.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
Yes, he had done them, secretly, filthily, time after time, and, hardened in sinful impenitence, he had dared to wear the mask of holiness before the tabernacle itself while his soul within was a living mass of corruption.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
Consciousness of place came ebbing back to him slowly over a vast tract of time unlit, unfelt, unlived.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
From time to time also he balked them by a sudden effort of the will, as by lifting them suddenly in the middle of an unfinished sentence and closing the book.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 4   Context
Lately some of their judgements had sounded a little childish in his ears and had made him feel a regret and pity as though he were slowly passing out of an accustomed world and were hearing its language for the last time.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 4   Context
It was an elfin prelude, endless and formless; and, as it grew wilder and faster, the flames leaping out of time, he seemed to hear from under the boughs and grasses wild creatures racing, their feet pattering like rain upon the leaves.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 4   Context
My first cousin, Fonsy Davin, was stripped to his buff that day minding cool for the Limericks but he was up with the forwards half the time and shouting like mad.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
And all the time she was talking, Stevie, she had her eyes fixed on my face and she stood so close to me I could hear her breathing.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
But, temporal or spatial, the esthetic image is first luminously apprehended as selfbounded and selfcontained upon the immeasurable background of space or time which is not it.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
Stephen took his place silently on the step below the group of students, heedless of the rain which fell fast, turning his eyes towards her from time to time.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
He moved a thin shrunken brown hand gently in the air in time to his praise and his thin quick eyelids beat often over his sad eyes.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
Welcome, O life, I go to encounter for the millionth time the reality of experience and to forge in the smithy of my soul the uncreated conscience of my race.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
The hour when he too would take part in the life of that world seemed drawing near and in secret he began to make ready for the great part which he felt awaited him the nature of which he only dimly apprehended.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 2   Context
He was born in a poor cowhouse in Judea and lived as a humble carpenter for thirty years until the hour of His mission had come.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
Ah yes, he would still be spared; he would repent in his heart and be forgiven; and then those above, those in heaven, would see what he would do to make up for the past: a whole life, every hour of life.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
A full hour had passed since his father had gone in with Dan Crosby, the tutor, to find out for him something about the university.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 4   Context
Through this image he had a glimpse of a strange dark cavern of speculation but at once turned away from it, feeling that it was not yet the hour to enter it.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
It was that windless hour of dawn when madness wakes and strange plants open to the light and the moth flies forth silently.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
The veiled windless hour had passed and behind the panes of the naked window the morning light was gathering.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
He had lifted up his arms and spoken in ecstasy to the sombre nave of the trees, knowing that he stood on holy ground and in a holy hour.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
The night you spent half an hour wrangling with Doherty about the shortest way from Sallygap to Larras.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
He wondered which was right, to be for the green or for the maroon, because Dante had ripped the green velvet back off the brush that was for Parnell one day with her scissors and had told him that Parnell was a bad man.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 1   Context
The fellows seemed to him to have grown smaller: that was because a sprinter had knocked him down the day before, a fellow out of second of grammar.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 1   Context
And one day Boyle had said that an elephant had two tuskers instead of two tusks and that was why he was called Tusker Boyle but some fellows called him Lady Boyle because he was always at his nails, paring them.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 1   Context
It was all thick slabs of slate and water trickled all day out of tiny pinholes and there was a queer smell of stale water there.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 1   Context
The rector would side with the prefect of studies and think it was a schoolboy trick and then the prefect of studies would come in every day the same, only it would be worse because he would be dreadfully waxy at any fellow going up to the rector about him.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 1   Context
A vague dissatisfaction grew up within him as he looked on the quays and on the river and on the lowering skies and yet he continued to wander up and down day after day as if he really sought someone that eluded him.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 2   Context
As the train steamed out of the station he recalled his childish wonder of years before and every event of his first day at Clongowes.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 2   Context
The neighbourhood of unseen sleepers filled him with strange dread, as though they could harm him, and he prayed that the day might come quickly.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 2   Context
I was standing at the end of the South Terrace one day with some maneens like myself and sure we thought we were grand fellows because we had pipes stuck in the corners of our mouths.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 2   Context
On the evening of the day on which the property was sold Stephen followed his father meekly about the city from bar to bar.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 2   Context
A figure that had seemed to him by day demure and innocent came towards him by night through the winding darkness of sleep, her face transfigured by a lecherous cunning, her eyes bright with brutish joy.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 2   Context
The swift December dusk had come tumbling clownishly after its dull day and, as he stared through the dull square of the window of the schoolroom, he felt his belly crave for its food.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
But Saturday and Sunday being free days some boys might be inclined to think that Monday is a free day also.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
Year after year, for much longer than any of you, my dear little boys, can remember or than I can remember, the boys of this college have met in this very chapel to make their annual retreat before the feast day of their patron saint.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
The soul of every human being that has ever existed, the souls of all those who shall yet be born, all the sons and daughters of Adam, all are assembled on that supreme day.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
All the filth of the world, all the offal and scum of the world, we are told, shall run there as to a vast reeking sewer when the terrible conflagration of the last day has purged the world.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
The daylight without was already failing and, as it fell slowly through the dull red blinds, it seemed that the sun of the last day was going down and that all souls were being gathered for the judgement.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 3   Context
His day began with an heroic offering of its every moment of thought or action for the intentions of the sovereign pontiff and with an early mass.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 4   Context
Every part of his day, divided by what he regarded now as the duties of his station in life, circled about its own centre of spiritual energy.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 4   Context
One day when some boys had gathered round a priest under the shed near the chapel, he had heard the priest say:.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 4   Context
My first cousin, Fonsy Davin, was stripped to his buff that day minding cool for the Limericks but he was up with the forwards half the time and shouting like mad.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
I told you that one day I wrote my name in pencil on the backside of the Venus of Praxiteles in the Museum.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
There came to his mind a curious phrase from CORNELIUS A LAPIDE which said that the lice born of human sweat were not created by God with the other animals on the sixth day.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
It is with him I must struggle all through this night till day come, till he or I lie dead, gripping him by the sinewy throat till.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 5   Context
On week days he did messages between the house in Carysfort Avenue and those shops in the main street of the town with which the family dealt.
James Joyce
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Chapter 2   Context
Then she put it back again in her pocket and gazed into the empty grate for some time without speaking.
James Joyce
Dubliners, THE SISTERS   Context
I liked better some American detective stories which were traversed from time to time by unkempt fierce and beautiful girls.
James Joyce
Dubliners, AN ENCOUNTER   Context
We were reassured: and I brought the first stage of the plot to an end by collecting sixpence from the other two, at the same time showing them my own sixpence.
James Joyce
Dubliners, AN ENCOUNTER   Context
The granite stone of the bridge was beginning to be warm and I began to pat it with my hands in time to an air in my head.
James Joyce
Dubliners, AN ENCOUNTER   Context
We spent a long time walking about the noisy streets flanked by high stone walls, watching the working of cranes and engines and often being shouted at for our immobility by the drivers of groaning carts.
James Joyce
Dubliners, AN ENCOUNTER   Context
The only sailor whose eyes could have been called green was a tall man who amused the crowd on the quay by calling out cheerfully every time the planks fell:.
James Joyce
Dubliners, AN ENCOUNTER   Context
When we had lain on the bank for some time without speaking I saw a man approaching from the far end of the field.
James Joyce
Dubliners, AN ENCOUNTER   Context
I sat staring at the clock for some time and, when its ticking began to irritate me, I left the room.
James Joyce
Dubliners, ARABY   Context
How well she remembered the first time she had seen him; he was lodging in a house on the main road where she used to visit.
James Joyce
Dubliners, EVELINE   Context
Her time was running out but she continued to sit by the window, leaning her head against the window curtain, inhaling the odour of dusty cretonne.
James Joyce
Dubliners, EVELINE   Context
He had money and he was popular; and he divided his time curiously between musical and motoring circles.
James Joyce
Dubliners, AFTER THE RACE   Context
After waiting for a little time he saw them coming towards him and, when they turned to the right, he followed them, stepping lightly in his white shoes, down one side of Merrion Square.
James Joyce
Dubliners, TWO GALLANTS   Context
He eyed this food earnestly for some time and then, after glancing warily up and down the street, went into the shop quickly.
James Joyce
Dubliners, TWO GALLANTS   Context
Mooney, who was a shrewd judge, knew that the young men were only passing the time away: none of them meant business.
James Joyce
Dubliners, THE BOARDING HOUSE   Context
She regarded the pillows for a long time and the sight of them awakened in her mind secret, amiable memories.
James Joyce
Dubliners, THE BOARDING HOUSE   Context
Of course, he did mix with a rakish set of fellows at that time, drank freely and borrowed money on all sides.
James Joyce
Dubliners, A LITTLE CLOUD   Context
She said she would do without any tea but when it came near the time at which the shop at the corner closed she decided to go out herself for a quarter of a pound of tea and two pounds of sugar.
James Joyce
Dubliners, A LITTLE CLOUD   Context
The man went up by the houses until he reached the door of the office, wondering whether he could finish his copy in time.
James Joyce
Dubliners, COUNTERPARTS   Context
The chief clerk began to hurry Miss Parker, saying she would never have the letters typed in time for post.
James Joyce
Dubliners, COUNTERPARTS   Context
Farrington gazed admiringly at the plump arm which she moved very often and with much grace; and when, after a little time, she answered his gaze he admired still more her large dark brown eyes.
James Joyce
Dubliners, COUNTERPARTS   Context
In these sheets a sentence was inscribed from time to time and, in an ironical moment, the headline of an advertisement for Bile Beans had been pasted on to the first sheet.
James Joyce
Dubliners, A PAINFUL CASE   Context
He had an odd autobiographical habit which led him to compose in his mind from time to time a short sentence about himself containing a subject in the third person and a predicate in the past tense.
James Joyce
Dubliners, A PAINFUL CASE   Context
The river lay quiet beside the empty distillery and from time to time a light appeared in some house on the Lucan road.
James Joyce
Dubliners, A PAINFUL CASE   Context
He opened his very long mouth suddenly to express disappointment and at the same time opened wide his very bright blue eyes to express pleasure and surprise.
James Joyce
Dubliners, IVY DAY IN THE COMMITTEE ROOM   Context
The artistes talked among themselves nervously, glanced from time to time at the mirror and rolled and unrolled their music.
James Joyce
Dubliners, A MOTHER   Context
He stood at the edge of the screen, from time to time jutting out his head and exchanging a laugh with two friends in the corner of the balcony.
James Joyce
Dubliners, A MOTHER   Context
Madam Glynn took her stand in a corner of the room, holding a roll of music stiffly before her and from time to time changing the direction of her startled gaze.
James Joyce
Dubliners, A MOTHER   Context
She waited until it was time for the second part to begin in the hope that the secretaries would approach her.
James Joyce
Dubliners, A MOTHER   Context
Kernan came of Protestant stock and, though he had been converted to the Catholic faith at the time of his marriage, he had not been in the pale of the Church for twenty years.
James Joyce
Dubliners, GRACE   Context
Every other order of the Church had to be reformed at some time or other but the Jesuit Order was never once reformed.
James Joyce
Dubliners, GRACE   Context
We might have had, we all had from time to time, our temptations: we might have, we all had, our failings.
James Joyce
Dubliners, GRACE   Context
He was laughing heartily in a high key at a story which he had been telling Gabriel on the stairs and at the same time rubbing the knuckles of his left fist backwards and forwards into his left eye.
James Joyce
Dubliners, THE DEAD   Context
Of course the girl or woman, or whatever she was, was an enthusiast but there was a time for all things.
James Joyce
Dubliners, THE DEAD   Context
Browne begged of them to sit down and eat their suppers and so did Gabriel but they said there was time enough, so that, at last, Freddy Malins stood up and, capturing Aunt Kate, plumped her down on her chair amid general laughter.
James Joyce
Dubliners, THE DEAD   Context
His curious eyes rested long upon her face and on her hair: and, as he thought of what she must have been then, in that time of her first girlish beauty, a strange, friendly pity for her entered his soul.
James Joyce
Dubliners, THE DEAD   Context
His own identity was fading out into a grey impalpable world: the solid world itself, which these dead had one time reared and lived in, was dissolving and dwindling.
James Joyce
Dubliners, THE DEAD   Context
He stood up slowly, saying that he had to leave us for a minute or so, a few minutes, and, without changing the direction of my gaze, I saw him walking slowly away from us towards the near end of the field.
James Joyce
Dubliners, AN ENCOUNTER   Context
And Maria laughed again till the tip of her nose nearly met the tip of her chin and till her minute body nearly shook itself asunder because she knew that Mooney meant well though, of course, she had the notions of a common woman.
James Joyce
Dubliners, CLAY   Context
The lower teeth and gums were covered with clotted blood and a minute piece of the tongue seemed to have been bitten off.
James Joyce
Dubliners, GRACE   Context
A vague terror seized Gabriel at this answer, as if, at that hour when he had hoped to triumph, some impalpable and vindictive being was coming against him, gathering forces against him in its vague world.
James Joyce
Dubliners, THE DEAD   Context
I found it strange that neither I nor the day seemed in a mourning mood and I felt even annoyed at discovering in myself a sensation of freedom as if I had been freed from something by his death.
James Joyce
Dubliners, THE SISTERS   Context
One day when Father Butler was hearing the four pages of Roman History clumsy Leo Dillon was discovered with a copy of The Halfpenny Marvel.
James Joyce
Dubliners, AN ENCOUNTER   Context
At night in my bedroom and by day in the classroom her image came between me and the page I strove to read.
James Joyce
Dubliners, ARABY   Context
Not long before, when she had been laid up for a day, he had read her out a ghost story and made toast for her at the fire.
James Joyce
Dubliners, EVELINE   Context
It was his habit to walk swiftly in the street even by day and whenever he found himself in the city late at night he hurried on his way apprehensively and excitedly.
James Joyce
Dubliners, A LITTLE CLOUD   Context
Malins, who had been silent all through the supper, said that her son was going down to Mount Melleray in a week or so.
James Joyce
Dubliners, THE DEAD   Context
And when I was only a week in the convent he died and he was buried in Oughterard, where his people came from.
James Joyce
Dubliners, THE DEAD   Context
MR HOLOHAN, assistant secretary of the Eire Abu Society, had been walking up and down Dublin for nearly a month, with his hands and pockets full of dirty pieces of paper, arranging about the series of concerts.
James Joyce
Dubliners, A MOTHER   Context
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