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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - time in David Copperfield
1  I felt it was a time for conversation and confidence.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
2  The mild Mr. Chillip could not possibly bear malice at such a time, if at any time.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
3  Now, all the time I had been on my visit, I had been ungrateful to my home again, and had thought little or nothing about it.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
4  I was crying all the time, but, except that I was conscious of being cold and dejected, I am sure I never thought why I cried.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
5  I did, at least; but I had my doubts of Peggotty, who was thoughtfully sticking her needle into various parts of her face and arms, all the time.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
6  But if he had asked the question twenty times, each time with twenty blows, I believe my baby heart would have burst before I would have told him so.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
7  The twilight was by this time shading down into darkness; and dimly as they saw each other, they could not have done that without the aid of the fire.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
8  Whether it was the following Sunday when I saw the gentleman again, or whether there was any greater lapse of time before he reappeared, I cannot recall.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
9  My sobs kept waking me, for a long time; and when one very strong sob quite hoisted me up in bed, I found my mother sitting on the coverlet, and leaning over me.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
10  I can make no claim therefore to have known, at that time, how matters stood; or to have any remembrance, founded on the evidence of my own senses, of what follows.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
11  I am sure I loved that baby quite as truly, quite as tenderly, with greater purity and more disinterestedness, than can enter into the best love of a later time of life, high and ennobling as it is.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
12  We made so many deviations up and down lanes, and were such a long time delivering a bedstead at a public-house, and calling at other places, that I was quite tired, and very glad, when we saw Yarmouth.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
13  It seems to me, at this distance of time, as if it were the next day when Peggotty broached the striking and adventurous proposition I am about to mention; but it was probably about two months afterwards.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
14  In time my eyes gradually shut up; and, from seeming to hear the clergyman singing a drowsy song in the heat, I hear nothing, until I fall off the seat with a crash, and am taken out, more dead than alive, by Peggotty.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
15  They left me, during this time, with a very nice man with a very large head of red hair and a very small shiny hat upon it, who had got a cross-barred shirt or waistcoat on, with 'Skylark' in capital letters across the chest.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
16  I sat looking at Peggotty for some time, in a reverie on this supposititious case: whether, if she were employed to lose me like the boy in the fairy tale, I should be able to track my way home again by the buttons she would shed.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
17  Whether sea-going people were short of money about that time, or were short of faith and preferred cork jackets, I don't know; all I know is, that there was but one solitary bidding, and that was from an attorney connected with the bill-broking business, who offered two pounds in cash, and the balance in sherry, but declined to be guaranteed from drowning on any higher bargain.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
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