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Quotes from Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - time in Oliver Twist
1  It was a nice sickly season just at this time.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
2  'Ah, you'll get used to it in time, Oliver,' said Sowerberry.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
3  For a long time, Oliver remained motionless in this attitude.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
4  They had been beaten, and starved, and shut up together, many and many a time.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
5  He had come a long way though, and should lose a great deal of time by doing so.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
6  Oliver wondered, in his own mind, whether it had taken a very long time to get Mr. Sowerberry used to it.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
7  Mr. Sowerberry remarked it and, without allowing time for any observation on the good lady's part, proceeded.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
8  Mr. Sowerberry was much tickled at this: as of course he ought to be; and laughed a long time without cessation.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
9  And the cocked hat and cane having been, by this time, adjusted to their owner's satisfaction, Mr. Bumble and Noah Claypole betook themselves with all speed to the undertaker's shop.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
10  Oliver, having had by this time as much of the outer coat of dirt which encrusted his face and hands, removed, as could be scrubbed off in one washing, was led into the room by his benevolent protectress.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
11  To these interrogations Mr. Bumble returned very brief and snappish replies; for the temporary blandness which gin-and-water awakens in some bosoms had by this time evaporated; and he was once again a beadle.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
12  Wretched as were the little companions in misery he was leaving behind, they were the only friends he had ever known; and a sense of his loneliness in the great wide world, sank into the child's heart for the first time.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
13  Now, if, during this brief period, Oliver had been surrounded by careful grandmothers, anxious aunts, experienced nurses, and doctors of profound wisdom, he would most inevitably and indubitably have been killed in no time.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
14  They walked on, for some time, through the most crowded and densely inhabited part of the town; and then, striking down a narrow street more dirty and miserable than any they had yet passed through, paused to look for the house which was the object of their search.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
15  He had no time to think about the matter, however; for Mr. Bumble gave him a tap on the head, with his cane, to wake him up: and another on the back to make him lively: and bidding him to follow, conducted him into a large white-washed room, where eight or ten fat gentlemen were sitting round a table.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
16  An unfinished coffin on black tressels, which stood in the middle of the shop, looked so gloomy and death-like that a cold tremble came over him, every time his eyes wandered in the direction of the dismal object: from which he almost expected to see some frightful form slowly rear its head, to drive him mad with terror.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
17  For some time, Mr. Bumble drew Oliver along, without notice or remark; for the beadle carried his head very erect, as a beadle always should: and, it being a windy day, little Oliver was completely enshrouded by the skirts of Mr. Bumble's coat as they blew open, and disclosed to great advantage his flapped waistcoat and drab plush knee-breeches.
Oliver Twist By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
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