UTTERANCE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
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 Current Search - utterance in Frankenstein
1  I never beheld anything so utterly destroyed.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
2  '"'It is utterly useless,' replied Felix; 'we can never again inhabit your cottage.'
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 16
3  Destiny was too potent, and her immutable laws had decreed my utter and terrible destruction.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
4  Krempe with warmth, "every instant that you have wasted on those books is utterly and entirely lost."
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 3
5  I ardently desired to understand them, and bent every faculty towards that purpose, but found it utterly impossible.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 13
6  Yet, although unhappy, he is not so utterly occupied by his own misery but that he interests himself deeply in the projects of others.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Letter 4
7  He might dissect, anatomize, and give names; but, not to speak of a final cause, causes in their secondary and tertiary grades were utterly unknown to him.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
8  A tear seemed to dim her eye when she saw us, but she quickly recovered herself, and a look of sorrowful affection seemed to attest her utter guiltlessness.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 8
9  I asked, it is true, for greater treasures than a little food or rest: I required kindness and sympathy; but I did not believe myself utterly unworthy of it.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 15
10  But now, when I appeared almost within grasp of my foe, my hopes were suddenly extinguished, and I lost all trace of him more utterly than I had ever done before.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 24
11  But I scarcely observed this; rage and hatred had at first deprived me of utterance, and I recovered only to overwhelm him with words expressive of furious detestation and contempt.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 10
12  It was one which could not fail to impress itself deeply on my mind, unfolding as it did a number of circumstances, each interesting and wonderful to one so utterly inexperienced as I was.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 14
13  I remembered also the nervous fever with which I had been seized just at the time that I dated my creation, and which would give an air of delirium to a tale otherwise so utterly improbable.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 7
14  Safie nursed her with the most devoted affection, but the poor girl died, and the Arabian was left alone, unacquainted with the language of the country and utterly ignorant of the customs of the world.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 14
15  I had begun my adjuration with solemnity and an awe which almost assured me that the shades of my murdered friends heard and approved my devotion, but the furies possessed me as I concluded, and rage choked my utterance.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 24
16  I was easily led by the sympathy which he evinced to use the language of my heart, to give utterance to the burning ardour of my soul and to say, with all the fervour that warmed me, how gladly I would sacrifice my fortune, my existence, my every hope, to the furtherance of my enterprise.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Letter 4
17  I know," continued the unhappy victim, "how heavily and fatally this one circumstance weighs against me, but I have no power of explaining it; and when I have expressed my utter ignorance, I am only left to conjecture concerning the probabilities by which it might have been placed in my pocket.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 8
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