VALOUR in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius by Niccolo Machiavelli
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 Current Search - valour in Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius
1  The valour of Horatius in vanquishing the Curiatii deserved the highest reward.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXIV.
2  It seems to me, therefore, that the same good fortune which, in this respect, attended the Romans, might be shared by all princes acting as they did, and of a valour equal to theirs.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I.
3  In the battle which ensued, the Samnites were routed, any firmness lent them by religion or by the oath they had sworn, being balanced by the Roman valour, and the terror inspired by past defeats.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XV.
4  Under the decemvirs the ancient valour of the Roman soldiers had in no degree abated; yet, because they were no longer animated by the same good will, they did not exert themselves as they were wont.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XLIII.
5  It would seem, too, that Titus Livius was of the same mind, since he very seldom puts a speech into the mouth of any Roman in which he discourses of valour, wherein he does not also make mention of Fortune.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I.
6  But Solomon could not transmit this inheritance to his son Rehoboam, who neither resembling his grandfather in valour, nor his father in good fortune, with difficulty made good his right to a sixth part of the kingdom.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIX.
7  But in those armies in which there exists not such an attachment towards him for whom they fight as makes them devoted to his cause, there never will be valour enough to withstand an enemy if only he be a little brave.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XLIII.
8  But even before this last victory, any one observing the order of these wars, and the method in which they were conducted, must have recognized not only the good fortune of the Romans, but also their extraordinary valour and prudence.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I.
9  For by the valour of her armies she spread her empire, while by her conduct of affairs, and by other methods peculiar to herself and devised by her first founder, she was able to keep what she acquired, as shall be fully shown in many of the following Discourses.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I.
10  One of these ways was that taken by Tullus and Metius, when each staked the existence of his country and the credit of his army on the valour and good fortune of three only of his soldiers, that being an utterly insignificant fraction of the force at his disposal.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXIII.
11  For we may reckon with certainty that if Rome had not had for her third king one who knew how to restore her credit by deeds of valour, she could not, or at any rate not without great difficulty, have afterwards held her ground, nor could ever have achieved the great exploits she did.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIX.
12  To the commons of Rome it seemed, in the abstract, that they had every right to be admitted to the consulship, since their party in the city was the more numerous, since they bore the greater share of danger in their wars, and since it was they who by their valour kept Rome free and made her powerful.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XLVII.
13  And here we may note that a prince who succeeds to another of superior valour, may reign on by virtue of his predecessor's merits, and reap the fruits of his labours; but if he live to a great age, or if he be followed by another who is wanting in the qualities of the first, that then the kingdom must necessarily dwindle.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIX.
14  For as they judged it of the utmost moment, that those in command of their armies should, in all they had to do, have their minds undisturbed and free from external anxieties, they would not add further difficulty and danger to a task in itself both dangerous and difficult, lest none should ever be found to act with valour.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXXI.
15  David, for example, not only surpassed in learning and judgment, but was so valiant in arms that, after conquering and subduing all his neighbours, he left to his young son Solomon a tranquil State, which the latter, though unskilled in the arts of war, could maintain by the arts of peace, and thus happily enjoy the inheritance of his father's valour.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIX.
16  For the captain who by his valour has won new dominions for his prince, since while overcoming his enemies, he at the same time covers himself with glory and enriches his soldiers, must needs acquire such credit with his own followers, and with the enemy, and also with the subjects of his prince, as cannot be wholly agreeable to the master who sent him forth.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXIX.
17  But should you lose some pass which you had reckoned on holding, and on the defence of which your country and army have relied, there commonly follows such panic among your people and among the troops which remain to you, that you are vanquished without opportunity given for any display of valour, and lose everything without bringing all your resources into play.
Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXIII.
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