WHITE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
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 Current Search - white in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
1  One uv 'em is white en shiny, en t'other one is black.'
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV.
2  In another second or two it was solid white and still again.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV.
3  and t'other chap, and a long white cotton nightshirt and a ruffled nightcap to match.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX.
4  De white one gits him to go right a little while, den de black one sail in en bust it all up.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV.
5  They dressed in white linen from head to foot, like the old gentleman, and wore broad Panama hats.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
6  They had white domestic awnings in front, and the country people hitched their horses to the awning-posts.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI.
7  They peddle out such a fish as that by the pound in the market-house there; everybody buys some of him; his meat's as white as snow and makes a good fry.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER X.
8  Jim he couldn't see no sense in the most of it, but he allowed we was white folks and knowed better than him; so he was satisfied, and said he would do it all just as Tom said.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVI.
9  Along during the morning I borrowed a sheet and a white shirt off of the clothes-line; and I found an old sack and put them in it, and we went down and got the fox-fire, and put that in too.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV.
10  Well, as I was saying about the parlor, there was beautiful curtains on the windows: white, with pictures painted on them of castles with vines all down the walls, and cattle coming down to drink.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII.
11  That was all right as far as it went, but the towhead warn't sixty yards long, and the minute I flew by the foot of it I shot out into the solid white fog, and hadn't no more idea which way I was going than a dead man.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV.
12  And here comes the white woman running from the house, about forty-five or fifty year old, bareheaded, and her spinning-stick in her hand; and behind her comes her little white children, acting the same way the little niggers was doing.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII.
13  His hands was long and thin, and every day of his life he put on a clean shirt and a full suit from head to foot made out of linen so white it hurt your eyes to look at it; and on Sundays he wore a blue tail-coat with brass buttons on it.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII.
14  He was thinking about his wife and his children, away up yonder, and he was low and homesick; because he hadn't ever been away from home before in his life; and I do believe he cared just as much for his people as white folks does for their'n.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII.
15  Why, before, he looked like the orneriest old rip that ever was; but now, when he'd take off his new white beaver and make a bow and do a smile, he looked that grand and good and pious that you'd say he had walked right out of the ark, and maybe was old Leviticus himself.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV.
16  On the table in the middle of the room was a kind of a lovely crockery basket that had apples and oranges and peaches and grapes piled up in it, which was much redder and yellower and prettier than real ones is, but they warn't real because you could see where pieces had got chipped off and showed the white chalk, or whatever it was, underneath.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII.