WIND in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
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 Current Search - wind in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
1  Confound it, I just expect the wind has blowed it to us.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI.
2  Directly it begun to rain, and it rained like all fury, too, and I never see the wind blow so.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX.
3  Now the way that the book winds up is this: Tom and me found the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.
4  We went winding in and out amongst the trees, and sometimes the vines hung so thick we had to back away and go some other way.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX.
5  There was an old horse-blanket nailed against the logs at the far end of the cabin behind the table, to keep the wind from blowing through the chinks and putting the candle out.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI.
6  When I struck the head of the island I never waited to blow, though I was most winded, but I shoved right into the timber where my old camp used to be, and started a good fire there on a high and dry spot.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI.
7  Well, we swarmed along down the river road, just carrying on like wildcats; and to make it more scary the sky was darking up, and the lightning beginning to wink and flitter, and the wind to shiver amongst the leaves.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX.
8  Well, early one morning we hid the raft in a good, safe place about two mile below a little bit of a shabby village named Pikesville, and the king he went ashore and told us all to stay hid whilst he went up to town and smelt around to see if anybody had got any wind of the Royal Nonesuch there yet.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI.
9  The stars were shining, and the leaves rustled in the woods ever so mournful; and I heard an owl, away off, who-whooing about somebody that was dead, and a whippowill and a dog crying about somebody that was going to die; and the wind was trying to whisper something to me, and I couldn't make out what it was, and so it made the cold shivers run over me.
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I.