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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - wind in David Copperfield
1  It was a very cold day, with cutting blasts of wind.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
2  A great wind rises, and the summer is gone in a moment.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
3  Mr. Omer and I nodded at each other, and Mr. Omer recruited his wind by the aid of his pipe.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30. A LOSS
4  I lay down in the old little bed in the stern of the boat, and the wind came moaning on across the flat as it had done before.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. I BECOME NEGLECTED, AND AM PROVIDED FOR
5  I say it ain't likely, in a man who knows his wind will go, when it DOES go, as if a pair of bellows was cut open; and that man a grandfather, said Mr. Omer.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30. A LOSS
6  The evening wind made such a disturbance just now, among some tall old elm-trees at the bottom of the garden, that neither my mother nor Miss Betsey could forbear glancing that way.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
7  As slumber gradually stole upon me, I heard the wind howling out at sea and coming on across the flat so fiercely, that I had a lazy apprehension of the great deep rising in the night.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
8  But there I was; and soon I was at our house, where the bare old elm-trees wrung their many hands in the bleak wintry air, and shreds of the old rooks'-nests drifted away upon the wind.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. MY HOLIDAYS. ESPECIALLY ONE HAPPY AFTERNOON
9  I recollect, as the wind and water began to sound fainter in my ears, putting a short clause into my prayers, petitioning that I might grow up to marry little Em'ly, and so dropping lovingly asleep.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. I BECOME NEGLECTED, AND AM PROVIDED FOR
10  I remembered her, from that instant, only as the young mother of my earliest impressions, who had been used to wind her bright curls round and round her finger, and to dance with me at twilight in the parlour.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. I HAVE A MEMORABLE BIRTHDAY
11  She was lightly dressed; looked bold, and haggard, and flaunting, and poor; but seemed, for the time, to have given all that to the wind which was blowing, and to have nothing in her mind but going after them.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22. SOME OLD SCENES, AND SOME NEW PEOPLE
12  To hear the wind getting up out at sea, to know that the fog was creeping over the desolate flat outside, and to look at the fire, and think that there was no house near but this one, and this one a boat, was like enchantment.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
13  I picture myself with my books shut up, still listening to the doleful performance of Mr. Mell, and listening through it to what used to be at home, and to the blowing of the wind on Yarmouth flats, and feeling very sad and solitary.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
14  The story of my supposed appetite getting wind among the outside passengers, they were merry upon it likewise; and asked me whether I was going to be paid for, at school, as two brothers or three, and whether I was contracted for, or went upon the regular terms; with other pleasant questions.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5. I AM SENT AWAY FROM HOME
15  Every time he uttered this ejaculation, his eyes seemed to be in danger of starting out; and every sentence he spoke, he delivered in a sort of tune, always exactly the same, and more like a gust of wind, which begins low, mounts up high, and falls again, than any other comparison I can find for it.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. THE SEQUEL OF MY RESOLUTION
16  When I undrew the curtains and looked out of bed, I saw him, in an equable temperature of respectability, unaffected by the east wind of January, and not even breathing frostily, standing my boots right and left in the first dancing position, and blowing specks of dust off my coat as he laid it down like a baby.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21. LITTLE EM'LY
17  One said she lived in the South Foreland Light, and had singed her whiskers by doing so; another, that she was made fast to the great buoy outside the harbour, and could only be visited at half-tide; a third, that she was locked up in Maidstone jail for child-stealing; a fourth, that she was seen to mount a broom in the last high wind, and make direct for Calais.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. THE SEQUEL OF MY RESOLUTION
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