WOOD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
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 Current Search - wood in Frankenstein
1  The wet wood which I had placed near the heat dried and itself became inflamed.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 11
2  Soon after this the young man returned, bearing on his shoulders a load of wood.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 11
3  It was not splintered by the shock, but entirely reduced to thin ribbons of wood.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
4  My place of refuge was constructed of wood, but so low that I could with difficulty sit upright in it.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 11
5  I covered it carefully with dry wood and leaves and placed wet branches upon it; and then, spreading my cloak, I lay on the ground and sank into sleep.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 11
6  On examining my dwelling, I found that one of the windows of the cottage had formerly occupied a part of it, but the panes had been filled up with wood.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 11
7  In the day, I believe, he worked sometimes for a neighbouring farmer, because he often went forth and did not return until dinner, yet brought no wood with him.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 12
8  When night came I quitted my retreat and wandered in the wood; and now, no longer restrained by the fear of discovery, I gave vent to my anguish in fearful howlings.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 16
9  I remember, the first time that I did this, the young woman, when she opened the door in the morning, appeared greatly astonished on seeing a great pile of wood on the outside.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 12
10  No wood, however, was placed on the earth, which formed the floor, but it was dry; and although the wind entered it by innumerable chinks, I found it an agreeable asylum from the snow and rain.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 11
11  I reflected on this, and by touching the various branches, I discovered the cause and busied myself in collecting a great quantity of wood, that I might dry it and have a plentiful supply of fire.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 11
12  I gave several hours to the serious consideration of this difficulty, but I was obliged to relinquish all attempt to supply it, and wrapping myself up in my cloak, I struck across the wood towards the setting sun.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 11
13  One night during my accustomed visit to the neighbouring wood where I collected my own food and brought home firing for my protectors, I found on the ground a leathern portmanteau containing several articles of dress and some books.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 15
14  I found that the youth spent a great part of each day in collecting wood for the family fire, and during the night I often took his tools, the use of which I quickly discovered, and brought home firing sufficient for the consumption of several days.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 12
15  I had been accustomed, during the night, to steal a part of their store for my own consumption, but when I found that in doing this I inflicted pain on the cottagers, I abstained and satisfied myself with berries, nuts, and roots which I gathered from a neighbouring wood.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 12
16  Early in the morning, before she had risen, he cleared away the snow that obstructed her path to the milk-house, drew water from the well, and brought the wood from the outhouse, where, to his perpetual astonishment, he found his store always replenished by an invisible hand.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 12
17  One part was open, and by that I had crept in; but now I covered every crevice by which I might be perceived with stones and wood, yet in such a manner that I might move them on occasion to pass out; all the light I enjoyed came through the sty, and that was sufficient for me.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 11
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