BRICK in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Up From Slavery: An Autobiography by Booker T. Washington
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 Current Search - Brick in Up From Slavery: An Autobiography
1  It seemed much like making bricks without straw.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter VII.
2  Most of the teachers advised the abandoning of the effort to make bricks.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
3  After a good deal of effort we moulded about twenty-five thousand bricks, and put them into a kiln to be burned.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
4  The making of these bricks taught me an important lesson in regard to the relations of the two races in the South.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
5  There was no brickyard in the town, and in addition to our own needs there was a demand for bricks in the general market.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
6  As soon as we got the farm work reasonably well started, we directed our next efforts toward the industry of making bricks.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
7  As the people of the neighbourhood came to us to buy bricks, we got acquainted with them; they traded with us and we with them.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
8  The community may not at the time be prepared for, or feel the need of, Greek analysis, but it may feel its need of bricks and houses and wagons.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
9  About the time that we succeeded in burning our first kiln of bricks we began facing in an emphasized form the objection of the students to being taught to work.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
10  I returned to Tuskegee, and, with the help of the fifteen dollars, rallied our rather demoralized and discouraged forces and began a fourth attempt to make bricks.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
11  Toward the latter part of the week, when it seemed as if we were going to have a good many thousand bricks in a few hours, in the middle of the night the kiln fell.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
12  Many white people who had had no contact with the school, and perhaps no sympathy with it, came to us to buy bricks because they found out that ours were good bricks.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
13  I had always sympathized with the "Children of Israel," in their task of "making bricks without straw," but ours was the task of making bricks with no money and no experience.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
14  I had always supposed that brickmaking was very simple, but I soon found out by bitter experience that it required special skill and knowledge, particularly in the burning of the bricks.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
15  Brickmaking has now become such an important industry at the school that last season our students manufactured twelve hundred thousand of first-class bricks, of a quality suitable to be sold in any market.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
16  The supplying of them to the people in the community has had the same effect as the supplying of bricks, and the man who learns at Tuskegee to build and repair wagons and carts is regarded as a benefactor by both races in the community where he goes.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
17  The making of these bricks caused many of the white residents of the neighbourhood to begin to feel that the education of the Negro was not making him worthless, but that in educating our students we were adding something to the wealth and comfort of the community.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.
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