CIVIL in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Up From Slavery: An Autobiography by Booker T. Washington
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 Current Search - Civil in Up From Slavery: An Autobiography
1  During the Civil War one of my young masters was killed, and two were severely wounded.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter I.
2  In this cabin I lived with my mother and a brother and sister till after the Civil War, when we were all declared free.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter I.
3  Although he fought the Southern white man in the Civil War, I never heard him utter a bitter word against him afterward.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter III.
4  Aside from this, there was a general feeling that the attempt to educate and civilize the red men at Hampton would be a failure.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter VI.
5  No enterprise seeking the material, civil, or moral welfare of this section can disregard this element of our population and reach the highest success.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter XIV.
6  It has been interesting to note the effect that the use of the tooth-brush has had in bringing about a higher degree of civilization among the students.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter XI.
7  In all my teaching I have watched carefully the influence of the tooth-brush, and I am convinced that there are few single agencies of civilization that are more far-reaching.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter IV.
8  Whenever they were asked to do so, the Negro students gladly took the Indians as room-mates, in order that they might teach them to speak English and to acquire civilized habits.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter VI.
9  He knew that the people in the North who gave money gave it for the purpose of helping the whole cause of Negro civilization, and not merely for the advancement of any one school.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter XII.
10  I cannot remember a single instance during my childhood or early boyhood when our entire family sat down to the table together, and God's blessing was asked, and the family ate a meal in a civilized manner.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter I.
11  Though I was a mere child during the preparation for the Civil War and during the war itself, I now recall the many late-at-night whispered discussions that I heard my mother and the other slaves on the plantation indulge in.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter I.
12  I said that in granting the appropriation Congress could do something that would prove to be of real and lasting value to both races, and that it was the first great opportunity of the kind that had been presented since the close of the Civil War.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter XIII.
13  How often I have wanted to say to white students that they lift themselves up in proportion as they help to lift others, and the more unfortunate the race, and the lower in the scale of civilization, the more does one raise one's self by giving the assistance.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter VI.
14  The things that they disliked most, I think, were to have their long hair cut, to give up wearing their blankets, and to cease smoking; but no white American ever thinks that any other race is wholly civilized until he wears the white man's clothes, eats the white man's food, speaks the white man's language, and professes the white man's religion.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter VI.
15  I told those who doubted the wisdom of the plan that I knew that our first buildings would not be so comfortable or so complete in their finish as buildings erected by the experienced hands of outside workmen, but that in the teaching of civilization, self-help, and self-reliance, the erection of buildings by the students themselves would more than compensate for any lack of comfort or fine finish.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter X.