EDMUND in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Edmund in Mansfield Park
1  "Fanny must have a horse," was Edmund's only reply.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER IV
2  As soon as she met with Edmund she told him her distress.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER III
3  Edmund was absent at this time, or the evil would have been earlier remedied.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER IV
4  She felt that she had a friend, and the kindness of her cousin Edmund gave her better spirits with everybody else.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER II
5  You have robbed Edmund for ten, twenty, thirty years, perhaps for life, of more than half the income which ought to be his.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER III
6  Suppose her a pretty girl, and seen by Tom or Edmund for the first time seven years hence, and I dare say there would be mischief.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER I
7  Edmund's friendship never failed her: his leaving Eton for Oxford made no change in his kind dispositions, and only afforded more frequent opportunities of proving them.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER II
8  The living was hereafter for Edmund; and, had his uncle died a few years sooner, it would have been duly given to some friend to hold till he were old enough for orders.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER III
9  Edmund was uniformly kind himself; and she had nothing worse to endure on the part of Tom than that sort of merriment which a young man of seventeen will always think fair with a child of ten.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER II
10  A week had passed in this way, and no suspicion of it conveyed by her quiet passive manner, when she was found one morning by her cousin Edmund, the youngest of the sons, sitting crying on the attic stairs.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER II
11  Fanny soon learnt how unnecessary had been her fears of a removal; and her spontaneous, untaught felicity on the discovery, conveyed some consolation to Edmund for his disappointment in what he had expected to be so essentially serviceable to her.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER III
12  He could not think Lady Bertram quite equal to supply his place with them, or rather, to perform what should have been her own; but, in Mrs. Norris's watchful attention, and in Edmund's judgment, he had sufficient confidence to make him go without fears for their conduct.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER III
13  Fanny thought it a bold measure, but offered no further resistance; and they went together into the breakfast-room, where Edmund prepared her paper, and ruled her lines with all the goodwill that her brother could himself have felt, and probably with somewhat more exactness.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER II
14  As to her cousins' gaieties, she loved to hear an account of them, especially of the balls, and whom Edmund had danced with; but thought too lowly of her own situation to imagine she should ever be admitted to the same, and listened, therefore, without an idea of any nearer concern in them.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER IV
15  Luckily the visit happened in the Christmas holidays, when she could directly look for comfort to her cousin Edmund; and he told her such charming things of what William was to do, and be hereafter, in consequence of his profession, as made her gradually admit that the separation might have some use.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER II
16  His daughters, he felt, while they retained the name of Bertram, must be giving it new grace, and in quitting it, he trusted, would extend its respectable alliances; and the character of Edmund, his strong good sense and uprightness of mind, bid most fairly for utility, honour, and happiness to himself and all his connexions.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER II
17  There was another family living actually held for Edmund; but though this circumstance had made the arrangement somewhat easier to Sir Thomas's conscience, he could not but feel it to be an act of injustice, and he earnestly tried to impress his eldest son with the same conviction, in the hope of its producing a better effect than anything he had yet been able to say or do.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER III
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