MARIA in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - Maria in Mansfield Park
1  "I believe we must be satisfied with less," said Maria.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
2  Julia Bertram was only twelve, and Maria but a year older.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
3  Maria's notions on the subject were more confused and indistinct.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
4  Maria, Julia, Henry Crawford, and Mr. Yates were in the billiard-room.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
5  Besides," said Maria, "I know that Mr. Crawford depends upon taking us.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
6  Yes," added Maria, "and her spirits are as good, and she has the same energy of character.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
7  Maria was just discontented enough to say directly, "I think you have done pretty well yourself, ma'am."
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
8  Julia might be justified in so doing by the hints of Mrs. Grant, inclined to credit what she wished, and Maria by the hints of Mr. Crawford himself.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
9  That would not be a very handsome reason for using Mr. Crawford's," said Maria; "but the truth is, that Wilcox is a stupid old fellow, and does not know how to drive.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
10  There was no positive ill-nature in Maria or Julia; and though Fanny was often mortified by their treatment of her, she thought too lowly of her own claims to feel injured by it.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
11  She had two sisters to be benefited by her elevation; and such of their acquaintance as thought Miss Ward and Miss Frances quite as handsome as Miss Maria, did not scruple to predict their marrying with almost equal advantage.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
12  Maria was more to be pitied than Julia; for to her the father brought a husband, and the return of the friend most solicitous for her happiness would unite her to the lover, on whom she had chosen that happiness should depend.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
13  While this was passing, the rest of the party being scattered about the chapel, Julia called Mr. Crawford's attention to her sister, by saying, "Do look at Mr. Rushworth and Maria, standing side by side, exactly as if the ceremony were going to be performed."
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
14  He had never knowingly given her pain, but he now felt that she required more positive kindness; and with that view endeavoured, in the first place, to lessen her fears of them all, and gave her especially a great deal of good advice as to playing with Maria and Julia, and being as merry as possible.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
15  About thirty years ago Miss Maria Ward, of Huntingdon, with only seven thousand pounds, had the good luck to captivate Sir Thomas Bertram, of Mansfield Park, in the county of Northampton, and to be thereby raised to the rank of a baronet's lady, with all the comforts and consequences of an handsome house and large income.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
16  "If poor Sir Thomas were fated never to return, it would be peculiarly consoling to see their dear Maria well married," she very often thought; always when they were in the company of men of fortune, and particularly on the introduction of a young man who had recently succeeded to one of the largest estates and finest places in the country.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
17  Being now in her twenty-first year, Maria Bertram was beginning to think matrimony a duty; and as a marriage with Mr. Rushworth would give her the enjoyment of a larger income than her father's, as well as ensure her the house in town, which was now a prime object, it became, by the same rule of moral obligation, her evident duty to marry Mr. Rushworth if she could.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.