FANNY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Fanny in Mansfield Park
1  From this day Fanny grew more comfortable.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
2  "I hope I am not ungrateful, aunt," said Fanny modestly.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
3  There were in fact but two years between the youngest and Fanny.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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4  The news was as disagreeable to Fanny as it had been unexpected.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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5  But I must tell you another thing of Fanny, so odd and so stupid.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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6  "This is not a very promising beginning," said Mrs. Norris, when Fanny had left the room.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
7  The first event of any importance in the family was the death of Mr. Norris, which happened when Fanny was about fifteen, and necessarily introduced alterations and novelties.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
8  Fanny Price was at this time just ten years old, and though there might not be much in her first appearance to captivate, there was, at least, nothing to disgust her relations.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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9  Fanny, whether near or from her cousins, whether in the schoolroom, the drawing-room, or the shrubbery, was equally forlorn, finding something to fear in every person and place.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
10  There was no positive ill-nature in Maria or Julia; and though Fanny was often mortified by their treatment of her, she thought too lowly of her own claims to feel injured by it.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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11  It required a longer time, however, than Mrs. Norris was inclined to allow, to reconcile Fanny to the novelty of Mansfield Park, and the separation from everybody she had been used to.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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12  You are sorry to leave Mama, my dear little Fanny," said he, "which shows you to be a very good girl; but you must remember that you are with relations and friends, who all love you, and wish to make you happy.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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13  Fanny, with all her faults of ignorance and timidity, was fixed at Mansfield Park, and learning to transfer in its favour much of her attachment to her former home, grew up there not unhappily among her cousins.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
14  Fanny's feelings on the occasion were such as she believed herself incapable of expressing; but her countenance and a few artless words fully conveyed all their gratitude and delight, and her cousin began to find her an interesting object.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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15  Fanny thought it a bold measure, but offered no further resistance; and they went together into the breakfast-room, where Edmund prepared her paper, and ruled her lines with all the goodwill that her brother could himself have felt, and probably with somewhat more exactness.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
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16  In the fullness of his belief that such a thing must be, he mentioned its probability to his wife; and the first time of the subject's occurring to her again happening to be when Fanny was present, she calmly observed to her, "So, Fanny, you are going to leave us, and live with my sister."
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
17  Fanny could read, work, and write, but she had been taught nothing more; and as her cousins found her ignorant of many things with which they had been long familiar, they thought her prodigiously stupid, and for the first two or three weeks were continually bringing some fresh report of it into the drawing-room.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
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