IMMEDIATE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Immediate in Pride and Prejudice
1  Elizabeth was surprised, but agreed to it immediately.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
2  The note was immediately dispatched, and its contents as quickly complied with.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
3  I did not know before," continued Bingley immediately, "that you were a studier of character.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
4  Under such circumstances, however, he was not likely to be proof against the temptation of immediate relief.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 52
5  My father is gone to London, and Jane has written to beg my uncle's immediate assistance; and we shall be off, I hope, in half-an-hour.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 46
6  Miss Bingley immediately fixed her eyes on his face, and desired he would tell her what lady had the credit of inspiring such reflections.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
7  Their eyes were immediately wandering up in the street in quest of the officers, and nothing less than a very smart bonnet indeed, or a really new muslin in a shop window, could recall them.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
8  Bingley urged Mr. Jones being sent for immediately; while his sisters, convinced that no country advice could be of any service, recommended an express to town for one of the most eminent physicians.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
9  Elizabeth was glad to be taken to her immediately; and Jane, who had only been withheld by the fear of giving alarm or inconvenience from expressing in her note how much she longed for such a visit, was delighted at her entrance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
10  Darcy was not of a disposition in which happiness overflows in mirth; and Elizabeth, agitated and confused, rather knew that she was happy than felt herself to be so; for, besides the immediate embarrassment, there were other evils before her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 59
11  Had she found Jane in any apparent danger, Mrs. Bennet would have been very miserable; but being satisfied on seeing her that her illness was not alarming, she had no wish of her recovering immediately, as her restoration to health would probably remove her from Netherfield.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
12  On entering the drawing-room she found the whole party at loo, and was immediately invited to join them; but suspecting them to be playing high she declined it, and making her sister the excuse, said she would amuse herself for the short time she could stay below, with a book.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
13  The first mentioned was, that, regardless of the sentiments of either, I had detached Mr. Bingley from your sister, and the other, that I had, in defiance of various claims, in defiance of honour and humanity, ruined the immediate prosperity and blasted the prospects of Mr. Wickham.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
14  She was not rendered formidable by silence; but whatever she said was spoken in so authoritative a tone, as marked her self-importance, and brought Mr. Wickham immediately to Elizabeth's mind; and from the observation of the day altogether, she believed Lady Catherine to be exactly what he represented.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 29
15  His own father did not long survive mine, and within half a year from these events, Mr. Wickham wrote to inform me that, having finally resolved against taking orders, he hoped I should not think it unreasonable for him to expect some more immediate pecuniary advantage, in lieu of the preferment, by which he could not be benefited.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
16  The sisters, on hearing this, repeated three or four times how much they were grieved, how shocking it was to have a bad cold, and how excessively they disliked being ill themselves; and then thought no more of the matter: and their indifference towards Jane when not immediately before them restored Elizabeth to the enjoyment of all her former dislike.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
17  She knew not the exact degree of his affection for his aunt, or his dependence on her judgment, but it was natural to suppose that he thought much higher of her ladyship than she could do; and it was certain that, in enumerating the miseries of a marriage with one, whose immediate connections were so unequal to his own, his aunt would address him on his weakest side.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 57
18  Mr. Wickham was the happy man towards whom almost every female eye was turned, and Elizabeth was the happy woman by whom he finally seated himself; and the agreeable manner in which he immediately fell into conversation, though it was only on its being a wet night, made her feel that the commonest, dullest, most threadbare topic might be rendered interesting by the skill of the speaker.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
19  To such perseverance in wilful self-deception Elizabeth would make no reply, and immediately and in silence withdrew; determined, if he persisted in considering her repeated refusals as flattering encouragement, to apply to her father, whose negative might be uttered in such a manner as to be decisive, and whose behaviour at least could not be mistaken for the affectation and coquetry of an elegant female.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
20  This part of his intelligence, though unheard by Lydia, was caught by Elizabeth, and, as it assured her that Darcy was not less answerable for Wickham's absence than if her first surmise had been just, every feeling of displeasure against the former was so sharpened by immediate disappointment, that she could hardly reply with tolerable civility to the polite inquiries which he directly afterwards approached to make.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18