JANE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
 Current Search - Jane in Pride and Prejudice
1  Elizabeth felt Jane's pleasure.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
2  Jane was so admired, nothing could be like it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
3  "It is from Miss Bingley," said Jane, and then read it aloud.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
4  But these are not Jane's feelings; she is not acting by design.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
5  Her hopes were answered; Jane had not been gone long before it rained hard.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
6  Jane was as much gratified by this as her mother could be, though in a quieter way.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
7  Jane should therefore make the most of every half-hour in which she can command his attention.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
8  The rain continued the whole evening without intermission; Jane certainly could not come back.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
9  Miss Bingley told me," said Jane, "that he never speaks much, unless among his intimate acquaintances.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
10  Lizzy is not a bit better than the others; and I am sure she is not half so handsome as Jane, nor half so good-humoured as Lydia.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1
11  Jane was therefore obliged to go on horseback, and her mother attended her to the door with many cheerful prognostics of a bad day.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
12  She was shown into the breakfast-parlour, where all but Jane were assembled, and where her appearance created a great deal of surprise.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
13  When Jane and Elizabeth were alone, the former, who had been cautious in her praise of Mr. Bingley before, expressed to her sister just how very much she admired him.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
14  When breakfast was over they were joined by the sisters; and Elizabeth began to like them herself, when she saw how much affection and solicitude they showed for Jane.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
15  Well," said Charlotte, "I wish Jane success with all my heart; and if she were married to him to-morrow, I should think she had as good a chance of happiness as if she were to be studying his character for a twelvemonth.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
16  But, though Bingley and Jane meet tolerably often, it is never for many hours together; and, as they always see each other in large mixed parties, it is impossible that every moment should be employed in conversing together.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
17  Elizabeth was glad to be taken to her immediately; and Jane, who had only been withheld by the fear of giving alarm or inconvenience from expressing in her note how much she longed for such a visit, was delighted at her entrance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
18  Miss Bingley offered her the carriage, and she only wanted a little pressing to accept it, when Jane testified such concern in parting with her, that Miss Bingley was obliged to convert the offer of the chaise to an invitation to remain at Netherfield for the present.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
19  By Jane, this attention was received with the greatest pleasure, but Elizabeth still saw superciliousness in their treatment of everybody, hardly excepting even her sister, and could not like them; though their kindness to Jane, such as it was, had a value as arising in all probability from the influence of their brother's admiration.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
20  The sisters, on hearing this, repeated three or four times how much they were grieved, how shocking it was to have a bad cold, and how excessively they disliked being ill themselves; and then thought no more of the matter: and their indifference towards Jane when not immediately before them restored Elizabeth to the enjoyment of all her former dislike.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8