LADY BERTRAM in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Lady Bertram in Mansfield Park
1  Lady Bertram made no opposition.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
2  Lady Bertram, I do not complain.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
3  Lady Bertram agreed with her instantly.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
4  Lady Bertram did not go into public with her daughters.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
5  My object, Lady Bertram, is to be of use to those that come after me.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
6  Lady Bertram listened without much interest to this sort of invective.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
7  "Then she had better come to us," said Lady Bertram, with the utmost composure.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
8  To the education of her daughters Lady Bertram paid not the smallest attention.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
9  Sir Thomas sent friendly advice and professions, Lady Bertram dispatched money and baby-linen, and Mrs. Norris wrote the letters.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
10  She was disheartened by Lady Bertram's silence, awed by Sir Thomas's grave looks, and quite overcome by Mrs. Norris's admonitions.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
11  Lady Bertram repeated enough of this conversation to her husband to convince him how much he had mistaken his sister-in-law's views; and she was from that moment perfectly safe from all expectation, or the slightest allusion to it from him.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
12  Lady Bertram did not at all like to have her husband leave her; but she was not disturbed by any alarm for his safety, or solicitude for his comfort, being one of those persons who think nothing can be dangerous, or difficult, or fatiguing to anybody but themselves.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
13  He could not think Lady Bertram quite equal to supply his place with them, or rather, to perform what should have been her own; but, in Mrs. Norris's watchful attention, and in Edmund's judgment, he had sufficient confidence to make him go without fears for their conduct.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
14  Fanny had no share in the festivities of the season; but she enjoyed being avowedly useful as her aunt's companion when they called away the rest of the family; and, as Miss Lee had left Mansfield, she naturally became everything to Lady Bertram during the night of a ball or a party.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
15  Lady Bertram did: she entirely agreed with her son as to the necessity of it, and as to its being considered necessary by his father; she only pleaded against there being any hurry; she only wanted him to wait till Sir Thomas's return, and then Sir Thomas might settle it all himself.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
16  They took their cheerful rides in the fine mornings of April and May; and Fanny either sat at home the whole day with one aunt, or walked beyond her strength at the instigation of the other: Lady Bertram holding exercise to be as unnecessary for everybody as it was unpleasant to herself; and Mrs. Norris, who was walking all day, thinking everybody ought to walk as much.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
17  From about the time of her entering the family, Lady Bertram, in consequence of a little ill-health, and a great deal of indolence, gave up the house in town, which she had been used to occupy every spring, and remained wholly in the country, leaving Sir Thomas to attend his duty in Parliament, with whatever increase or diminution of comfort might arise from her absence.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
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