PHAEACIANS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Odyssey by Homer
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 Current Search - Phaeacians in The Odyssey
1  Aldermen and town councillors of the Phaeacians, hear my words.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VII
2  I believe the gods who live in heaven have sent this man to the Phaeacians.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VI
3  Hear me," said he, "aldermen and town councillors of the Phaeacians, that I may speak even as I am minded.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VIII
4  Neptune, however, lay with his daughter, and she had a son by him, the great Nausithous, who reigned over the Phaeacians.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VII
5  There was also Euryalus son of Naubolus, who was like Mars himself, and was the best looking man among the Phaeacians except Laodamas.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VIII
6  Thus sang the bard, but Ulysses drew his purple mantle over his head and covered his face, for he was ashamed to let the Phaeacians see that he was weeping.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VIII
7  There he found all the chief people among the Phaeacians making their drink offerings to Mercury, which they always did the last thing before going away for the night.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VII
8  As the Phaeacians are the best sailors in the world, so their women excel all others in weaving, for Minerva has taught them all manner of useful arts, and they are very intelligent.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VII
9  This old woman had been brought by sea from Apeira, and had been chosen as a prize for Alcinous because he was king over the Phaeacians, and the people obeyed him as though he were a god.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VII
10  Presently Ulysses got up to go towards the town; and Minerva shed a thick mist all round him to hide him in case any of the proud Phaeacians who met him should be rude to him, or ask him who he was.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VII
11  Stranger," said she, "rise and let us be going back to the town; I will introduce you at the house of my excellent father, where I can tell you that you will meet all the best people among the Phaeacians.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VI
12  When it was time for them to start home, and they were folding the clothes and putting them into the waggon, Minerva began to consider how Ulysses should wake up and see the handsome girl who was to conduct him to the city of the Phaeacians.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VI
13  On this she led the way, and Ulysses followed in her steps; but not one of the Phaeacians could see him as he passed through the city in the midst of them; for the great goddess Minerva in her good will towards him had hidden him in a thick cloud of darkness.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VII
14  Here the chief persons of the Phaeacians used to sit and eat and drink, for there was abundance at all seasons; and there were golden figures of young men with lighted torches in their hands, raised on pedestals, to give light by night to those who were at table.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VII
15  But Minerva resolved to help Ulysses, so she bound the ways of all the winds except one, and made them lie quite still; but she roused a good stiff breeze from the North that should lay the waters till Ulysses reached the land of the Phaeacians where he would be safe.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK V
16  When the bard left off singing he wiped the tears from his eyes, uncovered his face, and, taking his cup, made a drink-offering to the gods; but when the Phaeacians pressed Demodocus to sing further, for they delighted in his lays, then Ulysses again drew his mantle over his head and wept bitterly.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VIII
17  A servant hung Demodocus's lyre on its peg for him, led him out of the cloister, and set him on the same way as that along which all the chief men of the Phaeacians were going to see the sports; a crowd of several thousands of people followed them, and there were many excellent competitors for all the prizes.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VIII
18  Here people deal in ship's gear of all kinds, such as cables and sails, and here, too, are the places where oars are made, for the Phaeacians are not a nation of archers; they know nothing about bows and arrows, but are a sea-faring folk, and pride themselves on their masts, oars, and ships, with which they travel far over the sea.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VI
19  Every one was struck with the appearance of Ulysses, for Minerva had beautified him about the head and shoulders, making him look taller and stouter than he really was, that he might impress the Phaeacians favourably as being a very remarkable man, and might come off well in the many trials of skill to which they would challenge him.
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK VIII
20  He could see him sailing upon the sea, and it made him very angry, so he wagged his head and muttered to himself, saying, "Good heavens, so the gods have been changing their minds about Ulysses while I was away in Ethiopia, and now he is close to the land of the Phaeacians, where it is decreed that he shall escape from the calamities that have befallen him."
The Odyssey By Homer
Get Context   In BOOK V