VANITY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - Vanity in Pride and Prejudice
1  Yes, vanity is a weakness indeed.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
2  It is very often nothing but our own vanity that deceives us.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
3  Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
4  There is so much of gratitude or vanity in almost every attachment, that it is not safe to leave any to itself.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
5  Her heart had been but slightly touched, and her vanity was satisfied with believing that she would have been his only choice, had fortune permitted it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
6  If his own vanity, however, did not mislead him, he was the cause, his pride and caprice were the cause, of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
7  Mary had neither genius nor taste; and though vanity had given her application, it had given her likewise a pedantic air and conceited manner, which would have injured a higher degree of excellence than she had reached.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
8  His behaviour to herself could now have had no tolerable motive; he had either been deceived with regard to her fortune, or had been gratifying his vanity by encouraging the preference which she believed she had most incautiously shown.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36
9  She lost all concern for him in finding herself thus selected as the object of such idle and frivolous gallantry; and while she steadily repressed it, could not but feel the reproof contained in his believing, that however long, and for whatever cause, his attentions had been withdrawn, her vanity would be gratified, and her preference secured at any time by their renewal.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 41