ANGER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - anger in Mansfield Park
1  It is anger to be talked of rather than felt.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
2  Their substance was great anger at the folly of each.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVII
3  But her uncle's anger gave her the severest pain of all.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
4  She calls herself very angry, but you can imagine her anger.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
5  She was almost vexed into displeasure and anger against Edmund.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLIV
6  My dearest Fanny," cried Edmund, pressing her arm closer to him, "do not let the idea of her anger distress you.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
7  Sir Thomas would not hear of it; and Mrs. Norris's anger against Fanny was so much the greater, from considering her residence there as the motive.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVIII
8  Edmund was almost as welcome to his brother as Fanny to her aunt; but Mrs. Norris, instead of having comfort from either, was but the more irritated by the sight of the person whom, in the blindness of her anger, she could have charged as the daemon of the piece.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVII
9  It was meant and done by Mrs. Grant, with perfect good-humour, on Mr. Rushworth's account, who was partly expected at the Park that day; but it was felt as a very grievous injury, and her good manners were severely taxed to conceal her vexation and anger till she reached home.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
10  If the gentleman would but persevere, if he had but love enough to persevere, Sir Thomas began to have hopes; and these reflections having passed across his mind and cheered it, "Well," said he, in a tone of becoming gravity, but of less anger, "well, child, dry up your tears."
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
11  In this spirit he began the attack, and by animated perseverance had soon re-established the sort of familiar intercourse, of gallantry, of flirtation, which bounded his views; but in triumphing over the discretion which, though beginning in anger, might have saved them both, he had put himself in the power of feelings on her side more strong than he had supposed.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVIII