APOLOGY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - apology in Pride and Prejudice
1  The necessity must be obeyed, and further apology would be absurd.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
2  On this subject I have nothing more to say, no other apology to offer.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
3  Mr. Collins repeated his apologies in quitting the room, and was assured with unwearying civility that they were perfectly needless.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
4  The chief of every day was spent by him at Lucas Lodge, and he sometimes returned to Longbourn only in time to make an apology for his absence before the family went to bed.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
5  She longed to speak, but could think of nothing to say; and after a short silence Mrs. Bennet began repeating her thanks to Mr. Bingley for his kindness to Jane, with an apology for troubling him also with Lizzy.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
6  With amazement did she first understand that he believed any apology to be in his power; and steadfastly was she persuaded, that he could have no explanation to give, which a just sense of shame would not conceal.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36
7  Her ladyship, with great condescension, arose to receive them; and as Mrs. Collins had settled it with her husband that the office of introduction should be hers, it was performed in a proper manner, without any of those apologies and thanks which he would have thought necessary.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 29
8  When she did come, it was very evident that she had no pleasure in it; she made a slight, formal apology, for not calling before, said not a word of wishing to see me again, and was in every respect so altered a creature, that when she went away I was perfectly resolved to continue the acquaintance no longer.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26