ASSURE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - assure in Pride and Prejudice
1  Your conjecture is totally wrong, I assure you.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
2  I do assure you that my intimacy has not yet taught me that.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
3  The favour of your company has been much felt, I assure you.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 38
4  But I can assure the young ladies that I come prepared to admire them.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
5  I assure you, madam," he replied, "that she does not need such advice.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 31
6  And even Mary could assure her family that she had no disinclination for it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
7  I have no reason, I assure you," said he, "to be dissatisfied with my reception.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
8  But everybody is to judge for themselves, and the Lucases are a very good sort of girls, I assure you.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
9  And now nothing remains for me but to assure you in the most animated language of the violence of my affection.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
10  I assure you, I feel it exceedingly," said Lady Catherine; "I believe no one feels the loss of friends so much as I do.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 37
11  Only let me assure you, my dear Miss Elizabeth, that I can from my heart most cordially wish you equal felicity in marriage.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 38
12  I do assure you, sir, that I have no pretensions whatever to that kind of elegance which consists in tormenting a respectable man.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
13  I assure you, that if Darcy were not such a great tall fellow, in comparison with myself, I should not pay him half so much deference.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
14  I am perfectly ready, I assure you, to keep my engagement; and when your sister is recovered, you shall, if you please, name the very day of the ball.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
15  But I can assure you," she added, "that Lizzy does not lose much by not suiting his fancy; for he is a most disagreeable, horrid man, not at all worth pleasing.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
16  You would have been less amiable in my eyes had there not been this little unwillingness; but allow me to assure you, that I have your respected mother's permission for this address.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
17  Thus much for my general intention in favour of matrimony; it remains to be told why my views were directed towards Longbourn instead of my own neighbourhood, where I can assure you there are many amiable young women.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
18  But Elizabeth had now recollected herself, and making a strong effort for it, was able to assure with tolerable firmness that the prospect of their relationship was highly grateful to her, and that she wished her all imaginable happiness.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
19  Had his first appearance, or his resemblance to the picture they had just been examining, been insufficient to assure the other two that they now saw Mr. Darcy, the gardener's expression of surprise, on beholding his master, must immediately have told it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
20  When at length they arose to take leave, Mrs. Bennet was most pressingly civil in her hope of seeing the whole family soon at Longbourn, and addressed herself especially to Mr. Bingley, to assure him how happy he would make them by eating a family dinner with them at any time, without the ceremony of a formal invitation.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18