BALLS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - balls in Mansfield Park
1  You spoke of the balls at Northampton.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI
2  You would have heard of balls and parties.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
3  I believe we must not think of a Northampton ball.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI
4  I should like to go to a ball with you and see you dance.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
5  No," replied Edmund; "I do not think she has ever been to a ball.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
6  If they were at home to grace the ball, a ball you would have this very Christmas.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI
7  The ball was now a settled thing, and before the evening a proclaimed thing to all whom it concerned.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI
8  These were anxious considerations; enough to sober her spirits even under the prospect of a ball given principally for her gratification.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI
9  Edmund, William, and Fanny did, in their different ways, look and speak as much grateful pleasure in the promised ball as Sir Thomas could desire.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI
10  Wear the necklace, as you are engaged to do, to-morrow evening, and let the chain, which was not ordered with any reference to the ball, be kept for commoner occasions.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
11  But Miss Crawford persevered, and argued the case with so much affectionate earnestness through all the heads of William and the cross, and the ball, and herself, as to be finally successful.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI
12  To engage her early for the two first dances was all the command of individual happiness which he felt in his power, and the only preparation for the ball which he could enter into, in spite of all that was passing around him on the subject, from morning till night.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI
13  Fanny had no share in the festivities of the season; but she enjoyed being avowedly useful as her aunt's companion when they called away the rest of the family; and, as Miss Lee had left Mansfield, she naturally became everything to Lady Bertram during the night of a ball or a party.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
14  As to her cousins' gaieties, she loved to hear an account of them, especially of the balls, and whom Edmund had danced with; but thought too lowly of her own situation to imagine she should ever be admitted to the same, and listened, therefore, without an idea of any nearer concern in them.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
15  It was Fanny's first ball, though without the preparation or splendour of many a young lady's first ball, being the thought only of the afternoon, built on the late acquisition of a violin player in the servants' hall, and the possibility of raising five couple with the help of Mrs. Grant and a new intimate friend of Mr. Bertram's just arrived on a visit.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
16  As for the ball, so near at hand, she had too many agitations and fears to have half the enjoyment in anticipation which she ought to have had, or must have been supposed to have by the many young ladies looking forward to the same event in situations more at ease, but under circumstances of less novelty, less interest, less peculiar gratification, than would be attributed to her.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
17  After dancing with each other at a proper number of balls, the young people justified these opinions, and an engagement, with a due reference to the absent Sir Thomas, was entered into, much to the satisfaction of their respective families, and of the general lookers-on of the neighbourhood, who had, for many weeks past, felt the expediency of Mr. Rushworth's marrying Miss Bertram.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.