BALLS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - balls in Pride and Prejudice
1  Perhaps by and by I may observe that private balls are much pleasanter than public ones.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
2  "And when you have given your ball," she added, "I shall insist on their giving one also."
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
3  The prospect of the Netherfield ball was extremely agreeable to every female of the family.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
4  Mary petitioned for the use of the library at Netherfield; and Kitty begged very hard for a few balls there every winter.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 55
5  I am perfectly ready, I assure you, to keep my engagement; and when your sister is recovered, you shall, if you please, name the very day of the ball.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
6  Mr. Darcy had at first scarcely allowed her to be pretty; he had looked at her without admiration at the ball; and when they next met, he looked at her only to criticise.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
7  I should like balls infinitely better," she replied, "if they were carried on in a different manner; but there is something insufferably tedious in the usual process of such a meeting.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
8  That the Miss Lucases and the Miss Bennets should meet to talk over a ball was absolutely necessary; and the morning after the assembly brought the former to Longbourn to hear and to communicate.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
9  She was very equal, therefore, to address Mr. Bingley on the subject of the ball, and abruptly reminded him of his promise; adding, that it would be the most shameful thing in the world if he did not keep it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
10  Mr. Bingley had soon made himself acquainted with all the principal people in the room; he was lively and unreserved, danced every dance, was angry that the ball closed so early, and talked of giving one himself at Netherfield.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
11  The two girls had been whispering to each other during the whole visit, and the result of it was, that the youngest should tax Mr. Bingley with having promised on his first coming into the country to give a ball at Netherfield.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
12  From the further disadvantage of Lydia's society she was of course carefully kept, and though Mrs. Wickham frequently invited her to come and stay with her, with the promise of balls and young men, her father would never consent to her going.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 61
13  Mary had heard herself mentioned to Miss Bingley as the most accomplished girl in the neighbourhood; and Catherine and Lydia had been fortunate enough never to be without partners, which was all that they had yet learnt to care for at a ball.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
14  Lady Lucas quieted her fears a little by starting the idea of his being gone to London only to get a large party for the ball; and a report soon followed that Mr. Bingley was to bring twelve ladies and seven gentlemen with him to the assembly.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
15  If there had not been a Netherfield ball to prepare for and talk of, the younger Miss Bennets would have been in a very pitiable state at this time, for from the day of the invitation, to the day of the ball, there was such a succession of rain as prevented their walking to Meryton once.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
16  The happiness anticipated by Catherine and Lydia depended less on any single event, or any particular person, for though they each, like Elizabeth, meant to dance half the evening with Mr. Wickham, he was by no means the only partner who could satisfy them, and a ball was, at any rate, a ball.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
17  The two young ladies were summoned from the shrubbery, where this conversation passed, by the arrival of the very persons of whom they had been speaking; Mr. Bingley and his sisters came to give their personal invitation for the long-expected ball at Netherfield, which was fixed for the following Tuesday.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
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