BEAUTY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - beauty in Pride and Prejudice
1  And, my dear Jane, I never saw you look in greater beauty.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 54
2  Lady Lucas herself has often said so, and envied me Jane's beauty.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
3  Elizabeth, equally next to Jane in birth and beauty, succeeded her of course.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
4  For my own part," she rejoined, "I must confess that I never could see any beauty in her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 45
5  I certainly have had my share of beauty, but I do not pretend to be anything extraordinary now.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 1
6  Her manners were pronounced to be very bad indeed, a mixture of pride and impertinence; she had no conversation, no style, no beauty.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
7  She had never seen a place for which nature had done more, or where natural beauty had been so little counteracted by an awkward taste.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
8  He had entertained hopes of being admitted to a sight of the young ladies, of whose beauty he had heard much; but he saw only the father.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
9  His appearance was greatly in his favour; he had all the best part of beauty, a fine countenance, a good figure, and very pleasing address.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
10  Darcy, on the contrary, had seen a collection of people in whom there was little beauty and no fashion, for none of whom he had felt the smallest interest, and from none received either attention or pleasure.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
11  Lady Catherine herself says that, in point of true beauty, Miss de Bourgh is far superior to the handsomest of her sex, because there is that in her features which marks the young lady of distinguished birth.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
12  Here, leading the way through every walk and cross walk, and scarcely allowing them an interval to utter the praises he asked for, every view was pointed out with a minuteness which left beauty entirely behind.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 28
13  Yet the misery, for which years of happiness were to offer no compensation, received soon afterwards material relief, from observing how much the beauty of her sister re-kindled the admiration of her former lover.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 53
14  Her father, captivated by youth and beauty, and that appearance of good humour which youth and beauty generally give, had married a woman whose weak understanding and illiberal mind had very early in their marriage put an end to all real affection for her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 42
15  I really do not think Georgiana Darcy has her equal for beauty, elegance, and accomplishments; and the affection she inspires in Louisa and myself is heightened into something still more interesting, from the hope we dare entertain of her being hereafter our sister.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
16  Mary was obliged to mix more with the world, but she could still moralize over every morning visit; and as she was no longer mortified by comparisons between her sisters' beauty and her own, it was suspected by her father that she submitted to the change without much reluctance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 61
17  Bingley had never met with more pleasant people or prettier girls in his life; everybody had been most kind and attentive to him; there had been no formality, no stiffness; he had soon felt acquainted with all the room; and, as to Miss Bennet, he could not conceive an angel more beautiful.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
18  He had not been long seated before he complimented Mrs. Bennet on having so fine a family of daughters; said he had heard much of their beauty, but that in this instance fame had fallen short of the truth; and added, that he did not doubt her seeing them all in due time disposed of in marriage.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 13
19  Every park has its beauty and its prospects; and Elizabeth saw much to be pleased with, though she could not be in such raptures as Mr. Collins expected the scene to inspire, and was but slightly affected by his enumeration of the windows in front of the house, and his relation of what the glazing altogether had originally cost Sir Lewis de Bourgh.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 29
20  With a glance, she saw that he had lost none of his recent civility; and, to imitate his politeness, she began, as they met, to admire the beauty of the place; but she had not got beyond the words "delightful," and "charming," when some unlucky recollections obtruded, and she fancied that praise of Pemberley from her might be mischievously construed.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43