BROTHER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Up From Slavery: An Autobiography by Booker T. Washington
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 Current Search - brother in Up From Slavery: An Autobiography
1  Though I was a mere child, my stepfather put me and my brother at work in one of the furnaces.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter II.
2  In company with my mother, brother, and sister, and a large number of other slaves, I went to the master's house.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter I.
3  In this cabin I lived with my mother and a brother and sister till after the Civil War, when we were all declared free.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter I.
4  My mother's husband, who was the stepfather of my brother John and myself, did not belong to the same owners as did my mother.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter II.
5  Aside from a very few dollars that my brother John was able to send me once in a while, I had no money with which to pay my board.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter III.
6  When he returned from Hampton, we both combined our efforts and savings to send our adopted brother, James, through the Hampton Institute.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter IV.
7  In three years my brother finished the course at Hampton, and he is now holding the important position of Superintendent of Industries at Tuskegee.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter IV.
8  I was very anxious to secure some clothes for the winter, but in this I was disappointed, except for a few garments which my brother John secured for me.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter IV.
9  About three o'clock in the morning my brother John found me asleep in this house, and broke to me, as gently as he could, the sad news that our dear mother had died during the night.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter IV.
10  In connection with the flax shirt, my brother John, who is several years older than I am, performed one of the most generous acts that I ever heard of one slave relative doing for another.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter I.
11  During the time that I was a student at Hampton my older brother, John, not only assisted me all that he could, but worked all of the time in the coal-mines in order to support the family.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter IV.
12  My brother John helped me all that he could, but of course that was not a great deal, for his work was in the coal-mine, where he did not earn much, and most of what he did earn went in the direction of paying the household expenses.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter III.
13  At the end of my second year at Hampton, by the help of some money sent me by my mother and brother John, supplemented by a small gift from one of the teachers at Hampton, I was enabled to return to my home in Malden, West Virginia, to spend my vacation.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter IV.
14  Soon after I began my first teaching in West Virginia I had picked out four of the brightest and most promising of my pupils, in addition to my two brothers, to whom I have already referred, and had given them special attention, with the view of having them go to Hampton.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter VI.
15  One might as well try to stop the progress of a mighty railroad train by throwing his body across the track, as to try to stop the growth of the world in the direction of giving mankind more intelligence, more culture, more skill, more liberty, and in the direction of extending more sympathy and more brotherly kindness.
Up From Slavery: An Autobiography By Booker T. Washington
Get Context   In Chapter XIII.