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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - but in Pride and Prejudice
1  Mary wished to say something sensible, but knew not how.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
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2  Bingley was by no means deficient, but Darcy was clever.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
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3  Miss Bennet he acknowledged to be pretty, but she smiled too much.
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4  I certainly have had my share of beauty, but I do not pretend to be anything extraordinary now.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
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5  Mrs. Bennet deigned not to make any reply, but, unable to contain herself, began scolding one of her daughters.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
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6  He had entertained hopes of being admitted to a sight of the young ladies, of whose beauty he had heard much; but he saw only the father.
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7  He had rather hoped that his wife's views on the stranger would be disappointed; but he soon found out that he had a different story to hear.
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8  At our time of life it is not so pleasant, I can tell you, to be making new acquaintances every day; but for your sakes, we would do anything.
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9  It may perhaps be pleasant," replied Charlotte, "to be able to impose on the public in such a case; but it is sometimes a disadvantage to be so very guarded.
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10  Mr. Bingley inherited property to the amount of nearly a hundred thousand pounds from his father, who had intended to purchase an estate, but did not live to do it.
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11  They were in fact very fine ladies; not deficient in good humour when they were pleased, nor in the power of making themselves agreeable when they chose it, but proud and conceited.
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12  If a woman conceals her affection with the same skill from the object of it, she may lose the opportunity of fixing him; and it will then be but poor consolation to believe the world equally in the dark.
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13  Your plan is a good one," replied Elizabeth, "where nothing is in question but the desire of being well married, and if I were determined to get a rich husband, or any husband, I dare say I should adopt it.
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14  His brother-in-law, Mr. Hurst, merely looked the gentleman; but his friend Mr. Darcy soon drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien, and the report which was in general circulation within five minutes after his entrance, of his having ten thousand a year.
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15  Elizabeth listened in silence, but was not convinced; their behaviour at the assembly had not been calculated to please in general; and with more quickness of observation and less pliancy of temper than her sister, and with a judgement too unassailed by any attention to herself, she was very little disposed to approve them.
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16  Mr. Bingley intended it likewise, and sometimes made choice of his county; but as he was now provided with a good house and the liberty of a manor, it was doubtful to many of those who best knew the easiness of his temper, whether he might not spend the remainder of his days at Netherfield, and leave the next generation to purchase.
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17  By Jane, this attention was received with the greatest pleasure, but Elizabeth still saw superciliousness in their treatment of everybody, hardly excepting even her sister, and could not like them; though their kindness to Jane, such as it was, had a value as arising in all probability from the influence of their brother's admiration.
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