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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - caring in Pride and Prejudice
1  She will be taken good care of.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
2  they will take care not to outrun their income.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 40
3  I will take care of myself, and of Mr. Wickham too.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
4  She liked him too little to care for his approbation.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
5  If I were as rich as Mr. Darcy," cried a young Lucas, who came with his sisters, "I should not care how proud I was.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
6  If it were merely a fine house richly furnished," said she, "I should not care about it myself; but the grounds are delightful.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 42
7  There will not be the smallest occasion for your coming to town again; therefore stay quiet at Longbourn, and depend on my diligence and care.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 49
8  Aye, there she comes," continued Mrs. Bennet, "looking as unconcerned as may be, and caring no more for us than if we were at York, provided she can have her own way.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 20
9  If I had been able," said she, "to carry my point in going to Brighton, with all my family, this would not have happened; but poor dear Lydia had nobody to take care of her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 47
10  We were born in the same parish, within the same park; the greatest part of our youth was passed together; inmates of the same house, sharing the same amusements, objects of the same parental care.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
11  He must write his own sermons; and the time that remains will not be too much for his parish duties, and the care and improvement of his dwelling, which he cannot be excused from making as comfortable as possible.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
12  She felt all the perverseness of the mischance that should bring him where no one else was brought, and, to prevent its ever happening again, took care to inform him at first that it was a favourite haunt of hers.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
13  She had dressed with more than usual care, and prepared in the highest spirits for the conquest of all that remained unsubdued of his heart, trusting that it was not more than might be won in the course of the evening.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
14  Mary had heard herself mentioned to Miss Bingley as the most accomplished girl in the neighbourhood; and Catherine and Lydia had been fortunate enough never to be without partners, which was all that they had yet learnt to care for at a ball.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
15  She inquired into Charlotte's domestic concerns familiarly and minutely, gave her a great deal of advice as to the management of them all; told her how everything ought to be regulated in so small a family as hers, and instructed her as to the care of her cows and her poultry.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 29
16  After lamenting it, however, at some length, she had the consolation that Mr. Bingley would be soon down again and soon dining at Longbourn, and the conclusion of all was the comfortable declaration, that though he had been invited only to a family dinner, she would take care to have two full courses.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
17  It was, moreover, such a promising thing for her younger daughters, as Jane's marrying so greatly must throw them in the way of other rich men; and lastly, it was so pleasant at her time of life to be able to consign her single daughters to the care of their sister, that she might not be obliged to go into company more than she liked.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
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