CHANCE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - chance in Mansfield Park
1  You have not the smallest chance of moving me.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
2  They would have two chances at least in their favour.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
3  Her visits there, beginning by chance, were continued by solicitation.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
4  But Miss Price and Mr. Edmund Bertram, I dare say, would take their chance.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
5  They may easily get her from Portsmouth to town by the coach, under the care of any creditable person that may chance to be going.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
6  One should be a brute not to feel for the distress they are in; and from what I hear, poor Mr. Bertram has a bad chance of ultimate recovery.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLV
7  Easter came particularly late this year, as Fanny had most sorrowfully considered, on first learning that she had no chance of leaving Portsmouth till after it.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLV
8  If by any officious exertions of his, she is induced to leave Henry's protection, there will be much less chance of his marrying her than if she remain with him.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVII
9  With all due respect to such of the present company as chance to be married, my dear Mrs. Grant, there is not one in a hundred of either sex who is not taken in when they marry.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
10  He had felt her as an hourly evil, which was so much the worse, as there seemed no chance of its ceasing but with life; she seemed a part of himself that must be borne for ever.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLVIII
11  So the uniform remained at Portsmouth, and Edmund conjectured that before Fanny had any chance of seeing it, all its own freshness and all the freshness of its wearer's feelings must be worn away.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
12  From this moment there was a return of his former jealousy, which Maria, from increasing hopes of Crawford, was at little pains to remove; and the chances of Mr. Rushworth's ever attaining to the knowledge of his two-and-forty speeches became much less.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
13  She could not live any longer in such solitary wretchedness; and she made her way to the Park, through difficulties of walking which she had deemed unconquerable a week before, for the chance of hearing a little in addition, for the sake of at least hearing his name.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
14  Having formed her mind and gained her affections, he had a good chance of her thinking like him; though at this period, and on this subject, there began now to be some danger of dissimilarity, for he was in a line of admiration of Miss Crawford, which might lead him where Fanny could not follow.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
15  There were, in fact, so many things to be attended to, so many people to be pleased, so many best characters required, and, above all, such a need that the play should be at once both tragedy and comedy, that there did seem as little chance of a decision as anything pursued by youth and zeal could hold out.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIV
16  Fanny believed there was scarcely a second feeling in common between them; and she may be forgiven by older sages for looking on the chance of Miss Crawford's future improvement as nearly desperate, for thinking that if Edmund's influence in this season of love had already done so little in clearing her judgment, and regulating her notions, his worth would be finally wasted on her even in years of matrimony.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII