CHARM in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - charm in Pride and Prejudice
1  She is a most charming young lady indeed.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
2  He is a sweet-tempered, amiable, charming man.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 16
3  Her behaviour to my dear Charlotte is charming.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 28
4  You are charmingly grouped, and appear to uncommon advantage.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
5  You have a sweet room here, Mr. Bingley, and a charming prospect over the gravel walk.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
6  Bingley was every thing that was charming, except the professed lover of her daughter.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 55
7  This was exactly as it should be; for the young man wanted only regimentals to make him completely charming.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
8  Her home and her housekeeping, her parish and her poultry, and all their dependent concerns, had not yet lost their charms.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 38
9  I have more than once observed to Lady Catherine, that her charming daughter seemed born to be a duchess, and that the most elevated rank, instead of giving her consequence, would be adorned by her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
10  She could see him instantly before her, in every charm of air and address; but she could remember no more substantial good than the general approbation of the neighbourhood, and the regard which his social powers had gained him in the mess.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36
11  The sudden acquisition of ten thousand pounds was the most remarkable charm of the young lady to whom he was now rendering himself agreeable; but Elizabeth, less clear-sighted perhaps in this case than in Charlotte's, did not quarrel with him for his wish of independence.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 26
12  Mrs. Gardiner was surprised and concerned; but as they were now approaching the scene of her former pleasures, every idea gave way to the charm of recollection; and she was too much engaged in pointing out to her husband all the interesting spots in its environs to think of anything else.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
13  His being such a charming young man, and so rich, and living but three miles from them, were the first points of self-gratulation; and then it was such a comfort to think how fond the two sisters were of Jane, and to be certain that they must desire the connection as much as she could do.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
14  The stupidity with which he was favoured by nature must guard his courtship from any charm that could make a woman wish for its continuance; and Miss Lucas, who accepted him solely from the pure and disinterested desire of an establishment, cared not how soon that establishment were gained.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
15  For such an attachment as this she might have sufficient charms; and though she did not suppose Lydia to be deliberately engaging in an elopement without the intention of marriage, she had no difficulty in believing that neither her virtue nor her understanding would preserve her from falling an easy prey.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 46
16  They entered the woods, and bidding adieu to the river for a while, ascended some of the higher grounds; when, in spots where the opening of the trees gave the eye power to wander, were many charming views of the valley, the opposite hills, with the long range of woods overspreading many, and occasionally part of the stream.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
17  With a glance, she saw that he had lost none of his recent civility; and, to imitate his politeness, she began, as they met, to admire the beauty of the place; but she had not got beyond the words "delightful," and "charming," when some unlucky recollections obtruded, and she fancied that praise of Pemberley from her might be mischievously construed.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
18  The idea soon reached to conviction, as she observed his increasing civilities toward herself, and heard his frequent attempt at a compliment on her wit and vivacity; and though more astonished than gratified herself by this effect of her charms, it was not long before her mother gave her to understand that the probability of their marriage was extremely agreeable to her.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17