CONFUSED in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - confused in Mansfield Park
1  The house is always in confusion.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
2  Her mind was in too much confusion.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
3  Maria's notions on the subject were more confused and indistinct.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
4  Fanny, in great astonishment and confusion, would have returned the present instantly.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVI
5  Her astonishment and confusion increased; and though still not knowing how to suppose him serious, she could hardly stand.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
6  To see the expression of her eyes, the change of her complexion, the progress of her feelings, their doubt, confusion, and felicity, was enough.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
7  It was soon pain upon pain, confusion upon confusion; for they were hardly in the High Street before they met her father, whose appearance was not the better from its being Saturday.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XLI
8  Sir Thomas had been a good deal surprised to find candles burning in his room; and on casting his eye round it, to see other symptoms of recent habitation and a general air of confusion in the furniture.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIX
9  There is nothing very striking in Mr. Rushworth's manners, but I was pleased last night with what appeared to be his opinion on one subject: his decided preference of a quiet family party to the bustle and confusion of acting.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX
10  Fanny was confused, but it was the confusion of discontent; while Miss Crawford wondered she did not smile, and thought her over-anxious, or thought her odd, or thought her anything rather than insensible of pleasure in Henry's attentions.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
11  Fanny was confused, but it was the confusion of discontent; while Miss Crawford wondered she did not smile, and thought her over-anxious, or thought her odd, or thought her anything rather than insensible of pleasure in Henry's attentions.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
12  These were not expressions to do Fanny any good; for though she read in too much haste and confusion to form the clearest judgment of Miss Crawford's meaning, it was evident that she meant to compliment her on her brother's attachment, and even to appear to believe it serious.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
13  When she had spoken it, she recollected herself, and wished it unsaid; but there was no need of confusion; for her brother saw her only as the supposed inmate of Mansfield parsonage, and replied but to invite her in the kindest manner to his own house, and to claim the best right in her.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX
14  She rushed out at an opposite door from the one her uncle was approaching, and was walking up and down the East room in the utmost confusion of contrary feeling, before Sir Thomas's politeness or apologies were over, or he had reached the beginning of the joyful intelligence which his visitor came to communicate.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
15  Three years ago the Admiral, my honoured uncle, bought a cottage at Twickenham for us all to spend our summers in; and my aunt and I went down to it quite in raptures; but it being excessively pretty, it was soon found necessary to be improved, and for three months we were all dirt and confusion, without a gravel walk to step on, or a bench fit for use.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI