DANCING in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - dancing in Pride and Prejudice
1  Such very superior dancing is not often seen.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
2  Come, Darcy," said he, "I must have you dance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
3  Indeed, sir, I have not the least intention of dancing.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
4  I was very much flattered by his asking me to dance a second time.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 4
5  Pray make my excuses to Pratt for not keeping my engagement, and dancing with him to-night.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 47
6  "You are dancing with the only handsome girl in the room," said Mr. Darcy, looking at the eldest Miss Bennet.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
7  Of this she was perfectly unaware; to her he was only the man who made himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough to dance with.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6
8  He made no answer, and they were again silent till they had gone down the dance, when he asked her if she and her sisters did not very often walk to Meryton.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
9  Mr. Bingley had soon made himself acquainted with all the principal people in the room; he was lively and unreserved, danced every dance, was angry that the ball closed so early, and talked of giving one himself at Netherfield.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
10  At that ball, while I had the honour of dancing with you, I was first made acquainted, by Sir William Lucas's accidental information, that Bingley's attentions to your sister had given rise to a general expectation of their marriage.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
11  He assured her, that as to dancing, he was perfectly indifferent to it; that his chief object was by delicate attentions to recommend himself to her and that he should therefore make a point of remaining close to her the whole evening.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
12  At that moment, Sir William Lucas appeared close to them, meaning to pass through the set to the other side of the room; but on perceiving Mr. Darcy, he stopped with a bow of superior courtesy to compliment him on his dancing and his partner.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
13  The latter part of this address was scarcely heard by Darcy; but Sir William's allusion to his friend seemed to strike him forcibly, and his eyes were directed with a very serious expression towards Bingley and Jane, who were dancing together.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
14  When the dancing recommenced, however, and Darcy approached to claim her hand, Charlotte could not help cautioning her in a whisper, not to be a simpleton, and allow her fancy for Wickham to make her appear unpleasant in the eyes of a man ten times his consequence.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
15  Jane pictured to herself a happy evening in the society of her two friends, and the attentions of her brother; and Elizabeth thought with pleasure of dancing a great deal with Mr. Wickham, and of seeing a confirmation of everything in Mr. Darcy's look and behaviour.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
16  Even Elizabeth might have found some trial of her patience in weather which totally suspended the improvement of her acquaintance with Mr. Wickham; and nothing less than a dance on Tuesday, could have made such a Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and Monday endurable to Kitty and Lydia.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
17  The happiness anticipated by Catherine and Lydia depended less on any single event, or any particular person, for though they each, like Elizabeth, meant to dance half the evening with Mr. Wickham, he was by no means the only partner who could satisfy them, and a ball was, at any rate, a ball.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
18  Elizabeth Bennet had been obliged, by the scarcity of gentlemen, to sit down for two dances; and during part of that time, Mr. Darcy had been standing near enough for her to hear a conversation between him and Mr. Bingley, who came from the dance for a few minutes, to press his friend to join it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 3
19  They stood for some time without speaking a word; and she began to imagine that their silence was to last through the two dances, and at first was resolved not to break it; till suddenly fancying that it would be the greater punishment to her partner to oblige him to talk, she made some slight observation on the dance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
20  Elizabeth, easy and unaffected, had been listened to with much more pleasure, though not playing half so well; and Mary, at the end of a long concerto, was glad to purchase praise and gratitude by Scotch and Irish airs, at the request of her younger sisters, who, with some of the Lucases, and two or three officers, joined eagerly in dancing at one end of the room.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 6