DEBT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - debt in Pride and Prejudice
1  He owed a good deal in town, but his debts of honour were still more formidable.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 48
2  You are quite a visit in my debt, Mr. Bingley," she added, "for when you went to town last winter, you promised to take a family dinner with us, as soon as you returned.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 53
3  He was declared to be in debt to every tradesman in the place, and his intrigues, all honoured with the title of seduction, had been extended into every tradesman's family.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 48
4  His debts are to be paid, amounting, I believe, to considerably more than a thousand pounds, another thousand in addition to her own settled upon her, and his commission purchased.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 52
5  The world has been deceived in that respect; and I am happy to say there will be some little money, even when all his debts are discharged, to settle on my niece, in addition to her own fortune.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 49
6  He confessed himself obliged to leave the regiment, on account of some debts of honour, which were very pressing; and scrupled not to lay all the ill-consequences of Lydia's flight on her own folly alone.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 52
7  If he were ever able to learn what Wickham's debts have been," said Elizabeth, "and how much is settled on his side on our sister, we shall exactly know what Mr. Gardiner has done for them, because Wickham has not sixpence of his own.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 49
8  And in the wretched state of his own finances, there was a very powerful motive for secrecy, in addition to his fear of discovery by Lydia's relations, for it had just transpired that he had left gaming debts behind him to a very considerable amount.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 48
9  With respect to Wickham, the travellers soon found that he was not held there in much estimation; for though the chief of his concerns with the son of his patron were imperfectly understood, it was yet a well-known fact that, on his quitting Derbyshire, he had left many debts behind him, which Mr. Darcy afterwards discharged.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 44