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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - do in Mansfield Park
1  Lady Bertram, I do not complain.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
2  I do not know where the error lies.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
3  "I do not know," replied Miss Crawford hesitatingly.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
4  You see the evil, but you do not see the consolation.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
5  But if you do not like it, there is no more to be said.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
6  All that English abilities can do has been tried already.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
7  You are very good, but do not trouble yourself about them.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
8  Miss Crawford soon felt that he and his situation might do.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
9  I only wish I could be more useful; but you see I do all in my power.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
10  Much was said on his side to induce her to attend the races, and schemes were made for a large party to them, with all the eagerness of inclination, but it would only do to be talked of.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
11  Fanny sighed, and said, "I cannot see things as you do; but I ought to believe you to be right rather than myself, and I am very much obliged to you for trying to reconcile me to what must be."
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
12  Cousin," said she, "something is going to happen which I do not like at all; and though you have often persuaded me into being reconciled to things that I disliked at first, you will not be able to do it now.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
13  Mrs. Norris could not help thinking that some steady old thing might be found among the numbers belonging to the Park that would do vastly well; or that one might be borrowed of the steward; or that perhaps Dr. Grant might now and then lend them the pony he sent to the post.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
14  Luckily the visit happened in the Christmas holidays, when she could directly look for comfort to her cousin Edmund; and he told her such charming things of what William was to do, and be hereafter, in consequence of his profession, as made her gradually admit that the separation might have some use.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
15  Mrs. Norris, on quitting the Parsonage, removed first to the Park, and afterwards to a small house of Sir Thomas's in the village, and consoled herself for the loss of her husband by considering that she could do very well without him; and for her reduction of income by the evident necessity of stricter economy.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
16  Whatever I can do, as you well know, I am always ready enough to do for the good of those I love; and, though I could never feel for this little girl the hundredth part of the regard I bear your own dear children, nor consider her, in any respect, so much my own, I should hate myself if I were capable of neglecting her.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
17  There was another family living actually held for Edmund; but though this circumstance had made the arrangement somewhat easier to Sir Thomas's conscience, he could not but feel it to be an act of injustice, and he earnestly tried to impress his eldest son with the same conviction, in the hope of its producing a better effect than anything he had yet been able to say or do.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
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