EAT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - eat in Mansfield Park
1  He has been ill ever since he did not eat any of the pheasant today.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
2  Besides, that would be all recreation and indulgence, without the wholesome alloy of labour, and I do not like to eat the bread of idleness.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
3  After the business of arriving was over, it was first necessary to eat, and the doors were thrown open to admit them through one or two intermediate rooms into the appointed dining-parlour, where a collation was prepared with abundance and elegance.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
4  The Doctor was very fond of eating, and would have a good dinner every day; and Mrs. Grant, instead of contriving to gratify him at little expense, gave her cook as high wages as they did at Mansfield Park, and was scarcely ever seen in her offices.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
5  In the moment of parting, Edmund was invited by Dr. Grant to eat his mutton with him the next day; and Fanny had barely time for an unpleasant feeling on the occasion, when Mrs. Grant, with sudden recollection, turned to her and asked for the pleasure of her company too.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
6  After a short consideration, Sir Thomas asked Crawford to join the early breakfast party in that house instead of eating alone: he should himself be of it; and the readiness with which his invitation was accepted convinced him that the suspicions whence, he must confess to himself, this very ball had in great measure sprung, were well founded.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
7  Her comfort in that day's dinner was quite destroyed: she could hardly eat anything; and when Sir Thomas good-humouredly observed that joy had taken away her appetite, she was ready to sink with shame, from the dread of Mr. Crawford's interpretation; for though nothing could have tempted her to turn her eyes to the right hand, where he sat, she felt that his were immediately directed towards her.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI