ENJOY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
 Current Search - enjoy in Pride and Prejudice
1  But, Lizzy, you look as if you did not enjoy it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 57
2  Mr. Bennet, in equal silence, was enjoying the scene.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
3  Elizabeth, after slightly surveying it, went to a window to enjoy its prospect.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
4  He was fond of the country and of books; and from these tastes had arisen his principal enjoyments.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 42
5  There are few people in England, I suppose, who have more true enjoyment of music than myself, or a better natural taste.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 31
6  I assure you that I have now learnt to enjoy his conversation as an agreeable and sensible young man, without having a wish beyond it.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 54
7  They had just been preparing to walk as the letters came in; and her uncle and aunt, leaving her to enjoy them in quiet, set off by themselves.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 46
8  She had spent six weeks with great enjoyment; and the pleasure of being with Charlotte, and the kind attentions she had received, must make her feel the obliged.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 38
9  When Mr. Collins could be forgotten, there was really an air of great comfort throughout, and by Charlotte's evident enjoyment of it, Elizabeth supposed he must be often forgotten.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 28
10  His cousin was as absurd as he had hoped, and he listened to him with the keenest enjoyment, maintaining at the same time the most resolute composure of countenance, and, except in an occasional glance at Elizabeth, requiring no partner in his pleasure.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
11  This, however, was no evil to Elizabeth, and upon the whole she spent her time comfortably enough; there were half-hours of pleasant conversation with Charlotte, and the weather was so fine for the time of year that she had often great enjoyment out of doors.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 30
12  Every object in the next day's journey was new and interesting to Elizabeth; and her spirits were in a state of enjoyment; for she had seen her sister looking so well as to banish all fear for her health, and the prospect of her northern tour was a constant source of delight.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 28
13  Lydia was occasionally a visitor there, when her husband was gone to enjoy himself in London or Bath; and with the Bingleys they both of them frequently staid so long, that even Bingley's good humour was overcome, and he proceeded so far as to talk of giving them a hint to be gone.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 61
14  Elizabeth, construing all this into a wish of hearing her speak of her sister, was pleased, and on this account, as well as some others, found herself, when their visitors left them, capable of considering the last half-hour with some satisfaction, though while it was passing, the enjoyment of it had been little.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 44
15  The sisters, on hearing this, repeated three or four times how much they were grieved, how shocking it was to have a bad cold, and how excessively they disliked being ill themselves; and then thought no more of the matter: and their indifference towards Jane when not immediately before them restored Elizabeth to the enjoyment of all her former dislike.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
16  The next was in these words: "I do not pretend to regret anything I shall leave in Hertfordshire, except your society, my dearest friend; but we will hope, at some future period, to enjoy many returns of that delightful intercourse we have known, and in the meanwhile may lessen the pain of separation by a very frequent and most unreserved correspondence."
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21
17  To these highflown expressions Elizabeth listened with all the insensibility of distrust; and though the suddenness of their removal surprised her, she saw nothing in it really to lament; it was not to be supposed that their absence from Netherfield would prevent Mr. Bingley's being there; and as to the loss of their society, she was persuaded that Jane must cease to regard it, in the enjoyment of his.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 21