EVIL in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - evil in Mansfield Park
1  You see the evil, but you do not see the consolation.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
2  A little difficulty to be overcome was no evil to Henry Crawford.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
3  It is an evil, but I am certainly making it less than it might be.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
4  The fatigue, too, of so long a journey, became soon no trifling evil.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
5  Edmund was absent at this time, or the evil would have been earlier remedied.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
6  What might have been hard to bear at Mansfield was to become a slight evil at Portsmouth.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
7  It was a sad, anxious day; and the morrow, though differing in the sort of evil, did by no means bring less.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX
8  I cannot think of it with any patience; and it does appear to me an evil of such magnitude as must, if possible, be prevented.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
9  In London he would soon learn to wonder at his infatuation, and be thankful for the right reason in her which had saved him from its evil consequences.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
10  To such feelings delay, even the delay of much preparation, would have been an evil, and Mr. Rushworth could hardly be more impatient for the marriage than herself.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
11  Should her disposition be really bad," said Sir Thomas, "we must not, for our own children's sake, continue her in the family; but there is no reason to expect so great an evil.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
12  But the evil ready to burst on her was at least delayed by the sudden change in Miss Crawford's ideas; by the strong effect on her mind which the finding herself in the East room again produced.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVI
13  Mr. Rushworth wished he had brought the key; he had been very near thinking whether he should not bring the key; he was determined he would never come without the key again; but still this did not remove the present evil.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
14  Mr. Crawford gone, Sir Thomas's next object was that he should be missed; and he entertained great hope that his niece would find a blank in the loss of those attentions which at the time she had felt, or fancied, an evil.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
15  She feared she had been doing wrong: saying too much, overacting the caution which she had been fancying necessary; in guarding against one evil, laying herself open to another; and to have Miss Crawford's liveliness repeated to her at such a moment, and on such a subject, was a bitter aggravation.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
16  Miss Crawford's style of writing, lively and affectionate, was itself an evil, independent of what she was thus forced into reading from the brother's pen, for Edmund would never rest till she had read the chief of the letter to him; and then she had to listen to his admiration of her language, and the warmth of her attachments.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVIII
17  Sir Thomas's sending away his son seemed to her so like a parent's care, under the influence of a foreboding of evil to himself, that she could not help feeling dreadful presentiments; and as the long evenings of autumn came on, was so terribly haunted by these ideas, in the sad solitariness of her cottage, as to be obliged to take daily refuge in the dining-room of the Park.
Mansfield Park By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
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