FAVOURITE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - favourite in Pride and Prejudice
1  Jane was beyond competition her favourite child.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 55
2  It was the favourite wish of his mother, as well as of hers.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 56
3  She is a very great favourite with some ladies of my acquaintance, Mrs. Hurst and Miss Bingley.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
4  This room was my late master's favourite room, and these miniatures are just as they used to be then.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 43
5  Sometimes one officer, sometimes another, had been her favourite, as their attentions raised them in her opinion.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 46
6  Mrs. Gardiner, who was several years younger than Mrs. Bennet and Mrs. Phillips, was an amiable, intelligent, elegant woman, and a great favourite with all her Longbourn nieces.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 25
7  My dearest Lizzy, do but consider in what a disgraceful light it places Mr. Darcy, to be treating his father's favourite in such a manner, one whom his father had promised to provide for.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 17
8  Lydia was a stout, well-grown girl of fifteen, with a fine complexion and good-humoured countenance; a favourite with her mother, whose affection had brought her into public at an early age.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
9  She felt all the perverseness of the mischance that should bring him where no one else was brought, and, to prevent its ever happening again, took care to inform him at first that it was a favourite haunt of hers.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 33
10  Elizabeth, particularly, who knew that her mother owed to the latter the preservation of her favourite daughter from irremediable infamy, was hurt and distressed to a most painful degree by a distinction so ill applied.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 53
11  She was proceeding directly to her favourite walk, when the recollection of Mr. Darcy's sometimes coming there stopped her, and instead of entering the park, she turned up the lane, which led farther from the turnpike-road.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
12  The faces of both, however, were tolerably calm; and no change was visible in either, except that the loss of her favourite sister, or the anger which she had herself incurred in this business, had given more of fretfulness than usual to the accents of Kitty.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 47
13  Her favourite walk, and where she frequently went while the others were calling on Lady Catherine, was along the open grove which edged that side of the park, where there was a nice sheltered path, which no one seemed to value but herself, and where she felt beyond the reach of Lady Catherine's curiosity.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 30
14  Lydia's being settled in the North, just when she had expected most pleasure and pride in her company, for she had by no means given up her plan of their residing in Hertfordshire, was a severe disappointment; and, besides, it was such a pity that Lydia should be taken from a regiment where she was acquainted with everybody, and had so many favourites.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 50
15  Wilfully and wantonly to have thrown off the companion of my youth, the acknowledged favourite of my father, a young man who had scarcely any other dependence than on our patronage, and who had been brought up to expect its exertion, would be a depravity, to which the separation of two young persons, whose affection could be the growth of only a few weeks, could bear no comparison.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35